A Walk through the Nave of the Crystal Palace 1854

The History of Sydenham from Cippenham to present day. Links to photos especially welcome!

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tulse hill terry
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Post by tulse hill terry » 11 Dec 2007 01:25

H.M.S. CRYSTAL PALACE

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I have started a thread on scans from the second of the Royal Naval Division here.

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http://forum.sydenham.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=2012

T. H. EVERITT

With the First World War there was demand from photographers to provide soldiers and sailors with photographic portraits to send home. [My photographer great grandfather did similar business at army camps at this time.] The local firm of THOMAS HOWARD EVERITT were ideally situated to serve this demand, making portraits of ratings at the naval camp that occupied the Crystal Palace during WW1 1914-18, as well as taking pictures of the local area.

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Somehow the firm acquired stock books created by Russell & Sons from the Negretti & Zambra archive. These were only recently discovered by T. H. Everitt’s heirs, and a few images were issued as limited edition giclee prints in 2004. I saw their stand at the Victorian Weekend that year, where they also displayed a massive glass plate negative of the cascades. They haven't appeared at the event again, and I have no idea if they have any plans for publication or even cataloguing the collection, or if they ever will. Their website has disappeared, and I have yet to get a response from the phone number on a leaflet issued at the time.
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Post by tulse hill terry » 11 Dec 2007 02:17

IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM 1920 - 24

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With the reopening of the Palace after WW1, and the presence of the Imperial War Museum, the main publisher seems to have been the firm of PHOTOCHROM of Tunbridge Wells. As well as postcards, they published a brochure of the Imperial War Museum display, and went on to publish the Guides to the Palace in a similar format until the Palace burnt down.

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"North Transept."

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"Captured Enemy Aircraft" in the South Transept.
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Post by tulse hill terry » 11 Dec 2007 02:32

PHOTOCHROM

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Post by tulse hill terry » 11 Dec 2007 02:52

Press Photographs.

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ARTHUR TALBOT

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Kennel Club [later Crufts] via Ideal Homes website.

"This view is of one of the last events ever to be staged at the Palace, in October 1936."

The most evocative record of the last days of the Palace, and its later dereliction was made by ARTHUR TALBOT, perhaps the same Talbot of the “Alexandra Series” of postcards. Prints are held by several local libraries, as well as the 6 colour images held by the Crystal Palace Museum. I would guess that all the images on the Crystal Palace Museum website are by Talbot, though the rights are managed by a descendant, Kenneth Talbot. Again, I do not know if this collection has been catalogued or if there are any plans to publish them, or if anyone even knows their full extent.

ALAN WARWICK

There is also the collection of images made by the late local historian Alan Warwick, who wrote "The Phoenix Suburb," and held by Lambeth Libraries.

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Post by tulse hill terry » 11 Dec 2007 03:24

1936 FIRE

From one of the last guides to the Palace, I would suggest anyone read this is they want to believe the Crystal Palace at Sydenham was in decline when it burnt down.

A MESSAGE FROM SIR HENRY BUCKLAND - MANAGER, CRYSTAL PALACE

"LATER DAYS

The 84 years which have elapsed since its opening as the great Exhibition in Hyde Park have witnessed a ceaseless endeavour to fulfil the original objects of the undertaking, and to maintain the early loyalty to art and the education of popular taste.

In 1914 the Crystal Palace and grounds were acquired in perpetuity for the nation. This was chiefly due to the untiring energy and sterling work of Sir David Burnett, Bart., who, during his year of office as Lord Mayor of London, made a strong and urgent appeal to the public for funds to save the Palace and its beautiful grounds from being raised, and in August, 1914, it became the property of the nation. Trustees were appointed in accordance with the Crystal Palace Act, 1914, and Sir David Burnett became its first chairman as a national undertaking.

Within a few days of its acquisition there came the crash of hostilities, and the Trustees offered the Palace and grounds to His Majesty’s Admiralty, rent free, and during the five years it was used as a naval depot rather more than 125,000 of our fighting men received their training there.

After the evacuation of the Palace by the naval authorities on January 1st, 1920, the great work of restoration and redecoration was taken in hand on a very generous scale, which has continued steadily, but very thoroughly, until the present day, with the result that the Crystal Palace is now in a better condition, decoratively and structurally, than it had been for the greater part of half a century.

The first project that was undertaken was the British Industries Fair by the Board of Trade. This was a great success, and practically all the exhibitors were delighted with the large number of orders booked during the run of the Exhibition. The general public were not admitted owing to its being a strictly trades exhibition. However the reopening of the Crystal Palace to the public was not long delayed.

IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM 1920 - 24

A great day dawned in its history, when, on June 9th, 1920, their Majesties the King and Queen, with members of the Royal Family, in the presence of a distinguished assembly, reopened the Crystal Palace as the property of the people and the home of the Imperial War Exhibition.

Members of the Cabinet, diplomatic services, and famous representatives of the fighting forces assisted in that never-to-be –forgotten ceremony. After infinite labour the objective records of the war were assembled in almost endless multitude and disposed in every available space in the main building to the best possible advantage. Guns, large and small, shells of every size, aeroplanes, pieces of armour-playing from ships, hospital equipments, models of trenches and shell-swept villages, and examples of the numberless contrivances used for the saving or destruction of life, together with a large number of pictures of high artistic value, found a resting-place within the immense casket of the Palace. For four years it held public interest and gave to its numberless visitors some faint conception of what the organisation of a nation fro war entailed.

VICTORY EXHIBITION

By the side of this part of the exhibition which was under the direction of the Government, the Palace management inaugurated a Victory exhibition. The sections devoted to the oil, engineering, electrical and gas industries were of exceptional interest, and to these may be added all the attractions of the Palace and its grounds of 200 acres, its musical festivals, fireworks, and constant succession of entertainments, the result being that the total receipts for the year 1920 constituted a record, exceeding even those for the opening of the Crystal Palace in 1854. (It is of interest to note that since the reopening, in June, 1920 to December 31st. 1934, no less than 14,348,909 people passed the turnstiles, a sufficient tribute to the public confidence in the ability of the management and quality of the exhibits and amusements.)

Visitors to the Palace could not, indeed, fail to be struck with the skill and taste evident in the scene presented to them as they stood in the Centre Transept and looked right or left down a long vista of mingled colour that seemed to produce an effect of well-nigh Oriental gaiety.

REPAIRS

But beyond the work of assembling exhibits much had been done that did not in its nature so obviously catch the eye. A great deal of the roof had been renewed; in fact, it is not too much to say that the structure had been in part rebuilt since the Palace became the property of the Nation. Many, many tons of glass were used in the renewing of the various roofs, the whole of the exterior and the greater part of the interior has been redecorated.

THE GREAT ORGAN

Not least among the “repairs” was the renovation of the famous Great organ. This instrument had been in position since 1857, the year of the first Handel Festival, and it is probable that it had had more continuous work than any other organ in the British Isles. Naturally, the mechanism had weakened and worn, the pipes needed recasting and revoicing; it became, in fact, obvious that the only proper method to adopt was that of entire rebuilding. After very careful consideration, the work was put in the hands of Messrs. J. W. Walker & Sons. The result – at a cost of £9,000 – was the birth of one of the finest instruments procurable and the complete justification of the large expenditure that had been incurred. “Discus” fan-blowers were installed, the pitch of the organ lowered, and an entirely new system of tubular pneumatic action was put in, while the best of the old pipe-work was retained, remodelled and remade. It is of interest to know that there are now no less than 3,174 speaking pipes in the instrument, and nearly five miles of lead piping.

HANDEL FESTIVAL 1920 - 26.

With the reconstruction of the organ it was natural that the Palace should emphasise once again its part in the musical education of the public. The Handel Festival was revived in 1920 and held again in 1923 and in 1926, and its former greatness was reasserted. Alas however, music is not now a paying proposition, and to stage a Handel festival at the present time, would I fear result in a heavy financial loss running into some thousands of pounds.

MOTOR CYCLE RACING

Outside the building popular amusement began to make a new claim upon the people, and once more the football ground re-established the attractiveness of amateur teams at the game. The famous Corinthians, to whom English Association football owes its highest ideals, have made the well-known Sydenham ground their home. Recently also an acknowledgement of this mechanical age has been introduced by the construction of what time will doubtless prove to be the finest Cinder Track for Motor Cycle Racing in the country, and the popularity of this thrilling sport for modern taste has already been fully demonstrated by the large attendances.

In may respects tastes have changed, and old forms of entertainment have given way to new, but the athletic meeting still has its attractions, and many sports meetings are held throughout the season on the sport’s arena, which is fully equipped for all forms of athletic contests. The Crystal Palace Cricket Club, one promoted by the immortal “W. G.” has gone, but in summer the ground that knew it is over-run with tennis courts, in obedience to the present taste. Away down by the boating lake the unwary stroller may still be alarmed by the unexpected sight of antediluvian monsters that have, though they be but models of their species, a fresh interest in view of the recent discoveries of the fossilised remains of the dinosaur and other mammoths.

Much has happened at the Crystal Palace during the period of its recent revival, and every effort is made to render its manifold energies of popular attractiveness and use. Whether it be the circus at Christmas time, one of the summer festivals, a dog show, a sports meeting, or an exhibition, or some other undertaking which is contained within the compass of a broad outlook, it represents the desire of the trustees and management to give, though a national property, full play to a nation’s characteristic activities in the world of reasonable amusement and pleasure.

ATTENDANCE FIGURES

Some figures compiled in January, 1935, are sufficient evidence of the things that have been done. Our total income, 1920 to 1934, amounts to £1,264,912, so reckoning the bad years with the good, if you take the average from the time when the Palace was opened to the public, on June 9th, 1920, to December 31st, 1934, you arrive at an income of £84,328 per annum. And in addition to the £1,264,912 we have collected in Entertainment Tax, thus we have handled nearly a million and a half sterling.

During the period under review we have spent a colossal sum, running into six figures, in restoring the Palace to its present state of efficiency, quite apart from the cost of the grounds and the heavy establishment charges, and no less than £144,002 have gone in advertising.

These figures are large, every large, as they show, but when they are put against the problem of maintaining a colossal glass house, with 24 acres of floor space and 200 acres of grounds, 20 of which have to be kept in order and opened free of charge to the public everyday of the year, it will be seen that only a well-thought-out economy can keep them as low as they are, and at the same time carry out the task efficiently. It must not be overlooked that when the Palace was acquired for the Nation it was derelict, but happily success followed a bold programme, and in spite of the fact that we started without a single shilling, plus an overdraft at the bank of £4,012, and were called upon to face a colossal expenditure to bring the Crystal Palace and Grounds to the present state of efficiency, our financial capital account, every shilling having been paid for out of current revenue, and we still have an available balance of £52,692.

THE FUTURE.

“The future is the past over again.” So it has been often defined, and so far as the Palace is concerned, it is at once true and the contrary of true. From the beginning the Palace, though in the hands of private enterprise, set out to supply a want and to become an asset in the life of the people. The first object persists today, and has been confirmed by the fact that the Palace is now the property of the Nation. It intends now, as at first, to provide at once a centre of varying useful interests and a playground. This double function has its complete justification in the character of the undertakings that find a place within its boundaries.

No other building exists in the country which can offer just the same facilities as the Palace can offer for exhibitions and shows of various kinds. The floor space has the advantage of being a permanent building and under one roof, and has obvious claims to notice greater than those which attach to temporary structures of one kind or another. In the past, from the Great Exhibition of 1851 onwards, the Palace has seen many exhibitions of great commercial importance, and in the national struggle back to commercial prosperity it is intended that it shall play its part, and place its resources at the service of those trades and pursuits whose enterprise persuades them to bring their combined activities before the public notice. A noticeable and somewhat remarkable example of the usefulness of the Palace in this direction was seen in the Oil Exhibition, which ran concurrently with the Victory Exhibition.

As evidence of progress, my speech at the annual Meeting, Guildhall, January 16th, 1935, will be of interest.
“A year ago I ventured to predict that 934 would prove a better year for the Crystal Palace, and happily my judgement was not at fault. The income for the year ended December 31st was £52,541 18s.1d., and the total expenditure £52,468 17s. 8d., balance £73 Os. 5d., which leaves us with an available balance of £52,692; £52,150 being invested in 3% War Loan; and from the Accounts point of view the difference on paper is £2,282 15s. 3d. better than 1933. More people passed through our turnstiles than in 1933, and fortunately it has proved a more profitable year by reason of new avenues of revenue, which has proved a more profitable year by reason of new avenues of revenue, which has enabled us to carry out several outstanding improvements. For instance we have, during, 1934, erected a new Staff Building, where the workmen now have their meals in comfort, and needless to say, this has been thoroughly appreciated by staff. The grounds, of nearly 200 acres, have been considerably improved. The solid marble bust of Sir Joseph Paxton, weighing eight tons, has been restored to prominent position in the centre walk and placed on a specially built pier at the height of some sixteen feet. Some of the original Trustees may remember this was a relic of the heavy dilapidations from the Festival of Empire Exhibition, which we inherited when we took over in 1914, and which was found dumped at the bottom of the Grounds. Other improvements include the restoration of the two remaining Architectural Courts to be renovated, viz.:- the Chinese [Sheffield?] and the Pompeian Courts, the latter of which is now nearing completion. The south nave has also been made more attractive. The famous old Crystal Fountain is now in the process of being illuminated, and almost all the Statuary from the Central Transept right down to the Low Level Station, has been redecorated. The School of art Section has also been thoroughly repaired and renovated. The Architectural Courts and Statuary are now really worth an inspection. These were produced by Royal Command and executed under the direction of skilled artists, whose works are recognised as the classical text-books upon decorative art. It would appear that some people think that the Crystal Palace and its beautiful grounds were acquired solely for pleasure purposes, but I venture to submit that we have acted wisely in carrying out these restorations, as undoubtedly the Palace is unparalleled in its store of art treasures, and I am of the opinion that future generations will in due course realise that these famous old replicas are a very valuable educational asset to the Nation. Furthermore, we have during the year erected an additional 11,520 square feet of new roofing, everything being absolutely renewed – gutters, zinc, iron, sash-bars and glass. The cost of all this new work and the other improvements to which I have referred – indeed, every kind of expenditure, whether of capital nature or otherwise (as always during our regime) has been charged to revenue Account. It should be borne in mind, that owing to the Crystal Palace having been closed to the public for some five years, we opened in 1920 with little or no goodwill.

“The following figured will give some indication of what has been accomplished. The income from 1920 to 1934 inclusive amounts to rather over a million and a quarter sterling, the exact figure being £1,254,912. In addition to this huge amount, a sum of £131,554 has been collected and paid over to the Government for entertainment Tax. If this money was returned to this great National Institution, as in the case and on the same principle as the Treasury recently saw fit to exempt the Old Vic and the Sadler’s Wells Theatre from the Entertainment Tax, it would enable us to launch in due course a magnificent exhibition, and history might very easily repeat itself in achieving similar results, as E.F.Benson suggested in an article which appeared in the Press last month, in which he referred to the troublesome times of 1848-1851, when the Great 1851 Exhibition proved of such outstanding benefit to practically all the nations of the world. Mr Benson pointed out that the peace of Europe, as things are at present, might easily be endangered, and that the surest way of averting a disaster was to prove to the unquiet nations that the prosperity of each was wrapped up with the industrial prosperity of others. The world’s progress was an indivisible unit, and it was for England to demonstrate that. He suggested there should be a Monster Exhibition in London, at which should be displayed all the products of the civilized world, and thus the nations would see that in the arts of peace, rather than in the destructive panoply of war, lay their salvation.

“Another interesting fact is that since the Crystal Palace was acquired for the Nation, £673,756 has been paid out in wages and salaries, which has been of considerable benefit both to the working man and to the neighbourhood generally. Once again, it must not be overlooked that the large amount of money paid out in Rates and Taxes has also been of considerable benefit to the various bodies concerned, so taking all things together, I am sure you will agree that the Crystal Palace is in every way a real National Asset, and carrying out its charter with credit to everybody concerned.

“You must remember there is no other building in the world quite like the Crystal palace – grand in its architecture – vast and extravagant in its upkeep, and on which, before its doors were opened in June, 1854, no less a sum than £1,350,000 had been spent. When it became the property of the Nation, some twenty years ago, as the original Trustees know only too well, it was an absolutely derelict property, and the vast restoration of a glass house of such magnitude (which had cost that colossal amount of money in 1854, when building costs were very different from those prevailing today) of necessity had to be spread over a long period, and even today, we are still erecting new roofing. Naturally, it has proved a tremendous task, requiring both pluck and determination, especially as the costs had to come out of revenue; in other words, all through the years we had to earn money before we spent it on the dilapidations and restorations, for there is no subsidy, but happily we now have something to show for our twenty years strenuous work, and I firmly believe that the date is not far distant when the Crystal Palace will play an even more important part in the national life of the people.”
It remains the commercial interests of the country to recognise and to use the opportunities which the Palace can provide to help them in their effort after the restoration of the country to its pre-eminent place in the commercial commonwealth of nations.

In its permanent attractions the Palace will make a bid to keep its old ground, with such modification and additions as time demand. The Architectural Courts, which have suffered considerable damage in the course of years, are gradually being restored at great expense, and will now take on again theirs first attractiveness. With the reawakening of public interest through the recent discovered in Egypt and elsewhere, these courts should now gain a greater measure of attention than they have had for a long time past. Of the grounds as a national playground it is hardly necessary to speak. Sport of every kind is an element in the English story and character, and the stress of modern life, together with the amelioration of the conditions under which a great part of it has hitherto been lived, has sent youth, and even the middle-aged, today to seek somewhere a place of recreation in some type of field exercise. No space near the metropolis offers better opportunity, in the best and most picturesque of surroundings, than that which the Palace offers. It is in this respect, as in others, the servant of the public, and awaits the public command."

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Sir Henry Buckland surveys the damage after the fire - 1936

MORE fire postcards here - link below.

http://forum.sydenham.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=4141

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tulse hill terry
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Post by tulse hill terry » 11 Dec 2007 04:34

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Post by tulse hill terry » 14 Dec 2007 20:12

A FUTURE FOR THE CRYSTAL PALACE.

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The Graphic.
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Post by tulse hill terry » 15 Dec 2007 16:01

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Post by tulse hill terry » 15 Dec 2007 19:56

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Falkor
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Post by Falkor » 16 Dec 2007 20:53

Terry, my old mate, you've covered the Central Transept extremely well indeed! I like your systematic approach--tackled like a real historian. The Jan Piggott book is written from an artistic point of view and doesn't even answer a fraction of the burning questions, but instead creates more unanswered questions. Seriously, the Jan Piggott approach is flawed beyond belief. In him is not a real historian, whose passionate about the local area, but an academic whose picked a subject to write about. Terry is the first historian to ever cover the palace in such a comprehensive manner. This is only a forum posting and based heavily on Samuel Philip's text, albeit updated and brought to life by many unseen pics gathered up from Terry's collection. Seriously, mate, you should consider writing a book about the palace then you would have a reason to a) acquire rights to more images and b) use more rarer images from your collection. You've definately got the right idea on how to deal with the palace proper. Your command of English is great--wouldn't need an editor. This topic is the perfect framework for any historian to build upon given access to a collection like Terry's; again, you are exactly on the right track, mate. This is precisely how it should be done. This is just what Lambeth, Croydon, Beckenham, Camberwell, Lewisham and Penge needs--a real book on the Crystal Palace! Come on guys, I know you all agree with me re: my little rant about the Jan Piggott book! :D Look above and throw your existing book in the nearest bin; here's to future research into the palace! Terry has proven his potential; the blueprint is outlined above. Merry Christmas and a happy new year; cheers! 8)

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Post by tulse hill terry » 18 Dec 2007 17:57

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Falkor
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Post by Falkor » 18 Dec 2007 19:46

My last word on the Jan Piggott book is, can suggest a better one?
Unfortunately, the ultimate book on the palace has yet to be written, which I know you could quite easily produce--faith notwithstanding--I KNOW you are the man for the job. Like many books on the palace, each have bits and pieces of information to offer on the palace, but none can be described as being better than any others or the "ultimate book" so to speak. Put it this way... what Jan Piggott has achieved with the Palace of the People doesn't even come close to what John Coulter has achieved with Sydenham and Forest Hill Past in the realm of local history. John Coulter's book is so high level that words fail me. There are many other books on Forest Hill and Sydenham, and again, they provide bits and pieces. However, most if not all the information--plus a hell of a lot more--is almost entirely contained within Sydenham and Forest Hill Past, which goes hand-in-hand with John Coulter and John Seaman's postcard books (Britain in old photos series). The latter pair are primarily for showcasing historical pictures of the local area, but yet the amount of text based information contained is incredible. I've got over 20 books of that style, published mainly from postcards of all different parts of London and Kent. I can tell you right now that no other historian I know of is better at writing captions than John Coulter. I predict Steve Grindlay would also do well at such an endeavor, but we Sydenhamites already have a lot to be proud of... It's all the surrounding parishes and boroughs of the Crystal Palace that ought to be ashamed for not having an all-round book on the palace--comprehensively covered. Again, Terry, you're the man for the job.
Negretti and Zambra had the concession for the creation and publication of images of the Crystal Palace from 1854 till about 1900.

The only exception seems to have been the series of 46 stereoviews published by the London Stereoscopic Company, created by Delamotte's assistant Thomas Richard Williams. Getty now own all the London Stereoscopic Companies archive, but don't seem to know what they have, or aren't interested to search unless money is involved.
The London Sterescopic Company produced 46 views; how many stereocards did Negretti and Zambra produce? Were there any other companies producing stereoscopic views of the palace?

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Post by tulse hill terry » 18 Feb 2008 00:12

Just found a site that links to this thread! :shock:

http://web.ncf.ca/ek867/2007_12_01-15_archives.html

APOLOGIES:

I'm sorry this thread looks such a mess at the moment. I finally plucked up the courage to tidy up my posts, so that I can update each section at a time.

Keep checking in for new content - all sourced [eventually] of course!

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Qualia
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Ethnology & Crystal Palace

Post by Qualia » 12 Jun 2008 14:27

Hi everyone, I am doing some research on the natural history court at Sydenham and wondered if anyone from this thread could help, particularly with locating some of the pictures.

Tulse Hill Terry you have some amazing stuff (like the picture of the Danakils) and I wondered if you would please be willing to share where you got those pictures and descriptions? You can PM if you don't want to list it on the thread. Anyway, I'd be really appreciative of any help any of you can offer.

Thank you.

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Post by tulse hill terry » 13 Jun 2008 17:34

Dear Qualia,

I am afraid the Natural History section at the Crystal Palace was criminally under recorded. The vast majority of images created at this end of the building are taken in the opposite direction, towards Osler's Crystal Fountain and beyond.

The image of the Danakils comes from the London Stereoscopic Company series of stereoviews, and is the only one of this section in that series. There is a map from the 1903 Motorshow, with yet another version of the layout of the Old and New World. You could check out the site for this created by Brian May.

And that is it it seems. By the time photography seems to have been allowed by visitors [a programme of 1893 reminds amateurs that Negretti and Zambra have sole authority to take pictures] this area was swept away for the 1911 Festival of Empire. The taxidermy seems to have survived till the building burnt down in 1936, but as to the ethnographic figures?

How much of the Archdeacon Gray's collection of Chinese artefacts were shown at the Palace is an interesting question, some at least now seems to be held in Brighton, was any of it displayed at Crystal Palace, when it was removed, were any figures given/taken to display them on. So much of this kind of display material was destroyed in the 1930-60's. The tale of the Victoria Cross gallery alone is a very sad one.

Hope this helps.

Qualia
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Post by Qualia » 13 Jun 2008 20:39

Dear Tulse Hill Terry,

many thanks. That is helpful. Can I just ask one other thing? Do you have a copy of the Danikil original? I'd really like a copy of the picture in higher resolution and if you had the original would be willing to supply a copy? Also, where did you get all the written material? I may have missed it, but I don't think I saw what you were quoting from.

Thanks, Qualia

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Post by Greg Whitehead » 11 Oct 2008 09:58

Phenomenal thread Tulse Hill Terry. As a quick aside are you Terry from Tulse Hill who I used to play Tennis with at the Sydenham club? Anyway, even if you're not I've just spent a few hours reading through this wonderful thread.

I had no idea (depsite visiting the CP museum and the site many times) just how large, all encompassing, varied and interesting the Crystal Palace was. From the many Courts to the grand dining on offer to the auditorium. The grandeur and the many uses for the CP just hadn't hit home to me ever (I mean Crufts using the CP just prior to it burning down!). The constant use of the CP for state and National events (effectively)...it really was a staggering edifice both in terms of stature and breadth of use.

That was also the most interesting aspect for me. I had bought into the theory of the CP falling into disrepair and neglect prior to the fire. The Later Days and the Future article on page4 clearly puts an end to that false rumour.

Thank you for taking the time. I really enjoyed the read and think I might have to give it another once over to fully take it all in and orientate myself properly.

With best Terry

Gregory

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Post by tulse hill terry » 18 Oct 2008 12:02

I am afraid Tennis is not my game.

Glad you have enjoyed the thread, my intention was to try and recreate the virtual experience the Crystal Palace was intended to provide.

I have more I would like to add to it, but don't want to make it overwhelming to read.

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From the Grand Fountain to the North wing of the Crystal Palace Sydenham ca. late 1850's

The statue is a copy of Bertel Thorwaldsen's "Mercury slaing Argus" and is stil on site, if very battered.

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Post by will greenwood » 9 Feb 2009 19:27

I recently had a go at converting the 3D images on this thread into anaglyphs, so the 3D can be seen with traditional red/green 3D glasses.
Image
there are several others here;
http://www.flickr.com/photos/35134674@N ... 558024710/
some are better than others and im still perfecting the process, but its a start

Anthony Clapham
Posts: 1
Joined: 19 Apr 2010 17:42
Location: London

Post by Anthony Clapham » 19 Apr 2010 17:48

I am researching the display of photographs at the Crystal Palace prior to 1880.

Owen Jones and Matthew Digby Wyatt were commissioned to go on a tour through France, Italy and Germany for the purposes of collecting illustrations of Architecture and Sculpure, the histories of which art were to be represented by ancient and modern spcecimens in the New Crystal Palace. A budget of £10,000 for Jones and Wyatt to acquire material was mentioned in the press. Jones and Wyatt returned from this tour in November 1852. Whether they returned with many photographs is unclear.

In December 1853 it was reported that “Excellent photographs would also adorn this court, [the Roman Court] illustrative of the present condition of the buildings and works of Roman art, together with copies of buildings of Venice, and of the Roman remains to be found in France.”

Samuel Phillips’s 1854 Guide to the Crystal Palace and Park notes Delamotte’s “Photographic Department” near the final industrial court and near the exit to the garden (p.121). This was described as containing a series of “views of the Palace and grounds - -illustrations, of a kind promising to displace the unsatisfactory prints which of late years have formed the sole questionable ornament for the walls of the working classes.” Several exhibitors of photographs were listed in the Department for Philosophical Instruments in the West Gallery, adjacent to the Central Transept. These include the photographers Richard Beard (“”Daguerreotype and Photographic Pictures, Stereoscopes, &etc.”), Antoine Claudet (“Daguerreotype and Stereoscopic Portraits”), J. Elliot (Daguerreotype and Stereoscopic Portraits”), Hennah and Kent (“Photographs”), R. Hogg (“Photographic Portraits, Landscapes, &c.”), Horne, Thornthwaite, and Wood (“Photographic Cameras, &c., Pictures, Medical Electro-Galvanic Machine”), M. Laroche (“Photographic Pictures”), J.E. Mayall (“Photographic Pictures”), T. Sharpe (“Photographic Portraits”)

Phillips also noted (p.143) that;
In the north-western Transept are specimens of photography. Nearer the Great Transept, in the same gallery, is arranged a valuable and interesting collection of photographs, illustrative of Oriental architecture, amongst which the Egyptian remains are particularly to be remarked.

Does any member of this thread know of interior views of the 1854-1858 period that clearly show the display of photographs?

Many thanks.

Anthony Clapham

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