Statues INSIDE the Crystal Palace.

The History of Sydenham from Cippenham to present day. Links to photos especially welcome!

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:55

PATRICK MACDOWELL

1799 – 1870

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_MacDowell

CHILDREN AT PLAY

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EUROPA [ALBERT MEMORIAL]

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LOVE TRIUMPHANT

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VIRGINIUS AND HIS DAUGHTER

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CUPID

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:58

WILLIAM CALDER MARSHALL. R. A.

1813 - 1894

William Calder Marshall, R.A., and A.R.S.A., was born at Edinburgh ; he studied his art under Chantrey and Baily, was at Rome in 1836-7-8, and has since pursued his art in London with deserved and increasing celebrity. He ahs produced many works remarkable for poetical grace and purity of feeling. He is one of the three sculptors employed in the House of Lords, for which he has executed the statues of the two Chancellors, Lord Clarendon and Lord Somers ; also the statue of Sir Robert Peel, in bronze, for Manchester.




49. THE FIRST WHISPER OF LOVE

Group. Life size.

This is perhaps intended for Cupid and the nymph Eucharis. He hides his bow behind him with the right hand, while with the left he removes her tresses and she bends down, half yielding, half fearful, to listen to his whispered tones. Classical, with something of modern sentiment in the conception.


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"First Whisper of Love" at the Crystal Palace, Sydenham Ca. 1850's. To the right is John Bell's 'Andromeda' and then his 'Dorothea.'


50. A DANCING GIRL.

Statue. Small life size.

The figure is represented in repose, and is particularly graceful and easy ; she holds a tambourine in the left hand, and in the right hand, which rests on the stem of a tree, she holds a garland. This statue should be compared with Canova’s conception of the same subject, No. 137. With equal elegance, the one before us has far more of nature, simplicity, and quietude. She is resting, while Canova’s dancer is only pausing. This statue was executed in marble, for the London Art Union, and exhibited in 1848. It has been reproduced, of a small size, in Parian, and forms an exquisite ornamental statuette. Classical style.


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51. SABRINA.

Statue. Small life size.

The subject is from Milton’s “Comus.” Sabrina (the nymph of the river Severn), is seated, listening to the invocation of the Attendant Spirit :-

“Sabrina fair,
Listen where thou art sitting
Under the glassy, cool, translucent wave,
In twisted braids of lilies knitting
The loose train of thy amber-dropping hair ;
Listen for dear honour’s sake,
Goddess of the silver lake ;
Listen, and save!”

This charming figure, beautiful in itself, and beautiful from its association with one of the greatest of our poets, has become extremely popular from the small copies in Parian which have found their way even to the antipodes. I am almost ashamed to add that the original marble still remains in the studio of the sculptor. Poetical style.


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52. ZEPHYR AND AURORA.

Group. Life size.

Zephyr leading forth Aurora (Eos, or the Dawn,) half sustains her with his circling arm, while the goddess, crowned with the morning star, and holding flowers in her hand, seems in the act of descending from the skies. A very beautiful and poetical composition. Classical style, verging on the picturesque.


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53. THE POET CHAUCER.

Statue. Life size. Standing.

Geoffrey Chaucer, the author of the Canterbury Tales, lived in the time of Edward III, and died in 1400. He is here represented in the dress of his time, holding a pen and book, and inkhorn. (See the Gallery of Portraits. No. 406).


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GODIVA - 1854

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:02

THOMAS MILNES

1813 – 1860'S?

ORIGINAL MODELS OF LIONS.

From Saltaire. Representing War, Peace, Determination, and Vigilance.

[These are only mentioned in a guide ca. 1900]

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/speel/sculpt/milnes.htm
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:03

ALEXANDER MUNRO

1825 - 1871

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Munro_(sculptor)

CHILD'S PLAY - 1854

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PAOLO AND FRANCESCO

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:04

EDGAR GEORGE PAPWORTH, Jun

1809 - 1866

Edgar George Papworth, Jun., studied under E. H. Baily, R.A., and received the Royal Academy gold medal for the best original group in sculpture in 1853.


http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/speel/sculpt/papworth.htm

54. A NYMPH OF DIANA.

Statue.

Seated and looking down upon her dog.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:05

JOHN EDWARD RICHARDSON

1812 - 1869

Statue. Seated figure. Life size.

Presented by the sculptor.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:07

HIRAM POWERS

1805 - 1873

GREEK SLAVE
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:08

LOUIS [FRANCIS] ROUBILLIAC

1705? - 1762

Louis Roubilliac was a Frenchman by birth, but as he lived, worked, and died in England, adopted it as his country, and is never reckoned among the French sculptors, I place him here. He was born at Lyons, about 1695, came to London, in 1720, a poor friendless boy, and began by working as a journeyman stone-cutter; from this position he raised himself to celebrity, and was, as Allan Cunningham emphatically styles him, “ a genius and a gentleman.” The first work which gave him reputation was his statue of Handel. His chef d’oeuvre is the statue of Sir Isaac Newton holding the prism, in the Library, at Cambridge. Everything Roubilliac did was full of life and vigour, but in the most exaggerated bad taste, theatrical in action, often incorrect in form, and the draperies heavy, angular, and fluttering in the wind. His busts are excellent. He died in 1762.


56. SHAKESPEARE

Statue. Life size.

The original marble was executed for Garrick about the year 1758, and now stands in the vestibule of Drury Lane Theatre. It is said that when the sculptor was considering in what position he should represent the great English poet, Garrick threw himself into an attitude which he thought poetical and Shakespearian; and thus the most gifted of mortal men stands before us here, trying to look elegant and inspired! Portrait statue; picturesque and artificial. Compare with Bell’s statue, No. 9.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:10


BENJAMIN EDWARD SPENCE.

1822 – 1866

Benjamin Edward Spence, born at Liverpool about 1825; studied at Rome under Gibson. He has successfully treated several subjects taken from our own poets, two of which are here exhibited ; a third, Ophelia, we have not seen.


SPENCE, BENJAMIN EDWARD (1822–1866), sculptor, was born in Liverpool in 1822. His father, William Spence, who was born in Chester, contributed to the Liverpool and the Manchester exhibitions, and in 1842 and 1844 to the Royal Academy; but later in life he became a partner in a business house in Liverpool, and abandoned the profession. He died in Liverpool on 6 July 1849, aged 56 years. The younger Spence, at the age of sixteen, successfully executed a portrait bust of William Roscoe [q. v.], and in 1846 he was awarded the Heywood silver medal and 5l. in money by the council of the Royal Manchester Institution for a group in clay of the death of the Duke of York at Agincourt. His father was then persuaded by his old friend, John Gibson, R.A., to send the young sculptor to Rome. Here he entered the studio of R. J. Wyatt, and also received much help from Gibson. Between 1849 and 1867 he contributed to the exhibition of the Royal Academy five times—in 1850 Ophelia, in 1856 ‘Venus and Cupid,’ in 1861 Hippolytus, and in 1867 ‘The Parting of Hector and Andromache.’ To the International Exhibition of 1862 he contributed two works, ‘Finding of Moses’ and ‘Jeanie Deans before Queen Caroline,’ and to the French International Exhibition of 1855 ‘Highland Mary.’ Many works of his that were not exhibited in England were engraved in the ‘Art Journal.’ He was not an artist of great originality, but his work has elegance and feeling. He died at Leghorn on 21 Oct. 1866.

[Redgrave's Dict. of Artists of English School; Art Journal, 1866, p. 364; Graves's Dict. of Artists; Exhibition Catalogues.]

- Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 53



57. LAVINIA.

Statue. Life size.

This is “the lovely young Lavinia” of Thomson’s Seasons, whose story is so familiar to us. She is represented as a gleaner looking down modestly, and holding in her hand a few ears of wheat. The moment chosen seems to be that where she stands before Palemon. Poetical style. This statue was executed in marble for Mr. S. Holmes of Liverpool.


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58. HIGHLAND MARY

Statue. Life size.

This statue represents that beautiful Highland girl whom Burns loved and immortalised. She holds in one hand a book, perhaps the poems of her lover ; the other holds her plaid, which I partly thrown over her head. The whole figure is expressive of that modesty and simplicity which we have associated with the character. Poetical and picturesque style.


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Highland Mary by Spence at the Palm House Sefton Park Liverpool

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Highland Mary at the Crystal Palace Sydenham. Ca. 1850's. The south facade of the Pompeian Court is behind.


59. FLORA.

Statue. Life size.

The Goddess of flowers (who was not a Greek, but a Roman divinity), is here represented crowned with flowers, holding a garland in both hands, and stepping forwards. Classical.


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ART JOURNAL
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:12

WILLIAM THEED.

1804 - 1891

William Theed, born in London, studied for five years as a pupil of E. H. Baily, R.A.: he then repaired to Rome, where he practised his art with deserved reputation and success for twenty-two years, assisted by the friendship and advice of Thorwaldsen and Gibson. The artist has now fixed his residence in London.


60. NARCISSUS.

Statue. Life size.

Narcissus was a beautiful youth of Thespis in Boetia, who, according to the Greek story, fell in love with his own face reflected in a fountain (mistaking it for that of a Naiad), and pining to death, was changed into the flower which bears his name. he is here represented standing, leaning on his hunting spear, and gazing into the streams. The original marble was executed in Rome for the queen, and is now at Osborne. Classical. (See No. 17.)

[1851 Dover p 322]


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61. PSYCHE.

Statue. Small life size.

She stands in a pensive attitude holding the bow of cupid. Executed in marble at Rome, for the Queen, and now at Osborne. Classical.


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ART JOURNAL

62. HUMPHREY CHETHAM.

Statue. Larger than life.

“The figure of Chetham is in an easy attitude, with a scroll of paper in his right hand ; and the head, which is characterised by considerable expression, has been copied from a well-authenticated portrait on panel. The costume is that of the Seventeenth century, and at the foot of the pedestal is a boy in the dress worn by those who receive their education in the school.

“Humphrey Chetham was the greatest benefactor of his time to the town of Manchester. He was born in 1586, being the third son of Henry Chetham, of Crumpsall, gentleman ; and is described by Fuller, in his ‘History of the Worthies of England,’ as ‘dealing in Manchester commodities sent up to London, and signally improving himself in piety and outward prosperity. He was a diligent reader of the scriptures and of the works of the Divines, and a respecter of such ministers which he recounted truly godly, upright, sober, discreet, and sincere. He was made high sheriff of the county of Lancaster in 1635, and discharged the place with so great honour, that very good gentlemen did wear his cloth at the assize to testify their unfeigned affection to him.’

“This admirable man founded a school for forty boys; and bequeathed 1000l. for the purchase of a library, and for the use of all who wished to improve themselves by reading. The value of the property bequeathed for these purpose has now so much increased as to be sufficient to educate, maintain, and clothe 100 boys; and the library which was thus begun contains, at the present time, more than 23,000 volumes of the best works in Theology, History, Greek and Miscellaneous Literature.

“The magnificent Statue now before us is the pious gift of one who, in early life, was a recipient of Chetham’s bounty; and who, after vainly endeavouring to enlist others who had been in like manner benefited, in the work of erecting a suitable memorial in honour of their benefactor, at length determined to undertake the whole himself. It would be but justice to the high motives of this gentleman, as well as gratifying to the public, if more were known respecting him than we are able to communicate; but his name is kept secret, and must remain so for some length of time.”


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AFRICA [ALBERT MEMORIAL]

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:14

JAMES THOM

1799 - 1850

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"This is a view of three of the four statues that are situated in the "alehouse" in the garden of Souter Johnnie's Cottage, Kirkoswald, Ayrshire. The figures were carved in sandstone by James Thom and depict Tam O'Shanter, Souter Johnnie, the Innkeeper and the Innkeeper's wife, all characters from Robert Burns' poem "Tam O'Shanter".

James Thom was a self-taught sculptor and carved the statues in c.1830. Thom was born near Tarbolton in 1799 and was apprenticed to a stonemason on leaving school. He was a skilful mason, and an Ayr entrepreneur commissioned from him a sandstone bust of Robert Burns. This sculpture resulted in many more commissions and often he sculpted characters from the works of Burns."
http://burns.scran.ac.uk/database/recor ... -521-608-C

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Image by Delamotte 1859, for the Crystal Palace Art Union. 1859 was the centenary of Robbie Burns celebrated at the Crystal Palace, Sydenham.

JOHN THOMAS

1813 - 1862

MUSIDORA

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http://forum.sydenham.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=2948

MORNING

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NIGHT

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DIANA

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:15

FREDERICK THRUPP.

1812 – 1895

(We have not been favoured with any particulars relative to this sculptor.)

63. A BOY WITH A BUTTERFLY.

Statue. Life size.

He kneels upon one knee, about to seize the winged creature which ahs settled on the ground. Suppose this subject treated with more of the classical spirit, it would suggest the idea of Eros about to raise Psyche (the soul), from the earth.


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from the 1851 Great Exhibition
http://www.earlyphotography.nl/ Thoughthe site seems to be down at the moment.

From later guides . . .

JOHN BUNYAN

GIRL WITH PET BIRD
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:17

HENRY WEEKES

1897 - 1877

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Weekes

GIRL WITH A HOOP

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YOUNG NATURALIST

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CA. 1898

MANUFACTURES [ALBERT MEMORIAL]

MOTHERS KISS

JOHN HUNTER

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:18

SIR RICHARD WESTMACOTT.

1775 - 1856

Sir Richard Westmacott, R.A., D.C.L., born in London ; went to Italy in 1792 ; studied for some time under Canova ; succeeded Flaxman as Professor of Sclpture in the Royal Academy in 1827.




64. PSYCHE

Statue. Life size.

The original marble is in the gallery of the Duke of Bedford, [at Woburn Abbey.]


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65. A YOUNG NYMPH.

Statue. Small life size.

She is in the act of unclasping her zone. The original marble is in the possession of the Earl of Carlisle


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Marble version at Castle Howard, destroyed in WWII, plaster at Soane Museum.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:19

RICHARD WESTMACOTT JUN R.A.

1799 - 1872

Richard Westmacott, Jun., R.A., born in London ; went to Italy in 1820, and studied there for six years, but not under any master.


"WESTMACOTT, RICHARD (1799–1872), sculptor, the eldest son of Sir Richard Westmacott [q. v.], by his marriage with Dorothy Margaret Wilkinson, was born in London in 1799. He originally desired to become a barrister, but yielded to his father's wish that he should enter his studio and be trained as a sculptor. In 1818 he was admitted to the school of the Royal Academy. In 1820 his father sent him to Italy, where he remained six years, studying ancient sculpture and its history. On his return he resided in his father's house, 14 South Audley Street, till 1830, when he removed to 21 Wilton Place.

In 1827 he exhibited his first statue at the Royal Academy, ‘Girl with a Bird.’ This was followed in 1829 by six works, statues of ‘A Reaper’ and ‘Girl with a Fawn,’ and four portrait-busts. In 1830 he exhibited ‘The Guardian Angel;’ in 1831 ‘Venus carrying off Ascanius,’ for the Earl of Ellesmere, for whom he also executed ‘Venus instructing Cupid,’ exhibited in 1838, ‘The Bluebell,’ and ‘The Butterfly.’ In 1832 he exhibited ‘The Cymbal-player,’ purchased by the Duke of Devonshire; in 1833 ‘Narcissus;’ in 1834 ‘The Pilgrim’ and ‘Hope;’ in 1837 ‘Mercury presenting Pandora to Prometheus’ and ‘Wycliffe Preaching’ (for Lutterworth church); in 1838 ‘Paolo and Francesca’ for the Marquis of Lansdowne. In that year Westmacott was elected an associate of the Royal Academy, of which he became a full member in 1849. From 1840 onwards till 1855, when he retired from his profession and ceased to exhibit, he was engaged principally on portrait statues and busts and monumental sculpture. The more interesting of his busts were those of John Henry Newman, 1841; Lord John Russell, 1843; Sir Francis Burdett, 1845; Sir Roderick Murchison, 1848. Other subjects were ‘Ariel,’ 1841; ‘The Soul enslaved by Sin,’ a relief, 1847; ‘Go and sin no more,’ 1850; ‘David,’ 1852. Westmacott exhibited in all eighty-two works at the Royal Academy, in addition to four at the British Institution.

Westmacott's only important public work in London was the sculpture in the pediment of the west front of the Royal Exchange, erected 1842–4. The recumbent statue of Archbishop Howley in the choir of Canterbury Cathedral, exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1850, is the most important of his monuments.

In 1857 he succeeded his father as professor of sculpture at the Royal Academy, and held that office till 1867. He was a fellow of the Royal Society, to which he was elected on 25 May 1837, and was well known as a writer and lecturer on art, contributing articles on sculpture to the ‘Encyclopædia Metropolitana,’ the ‘English Encyclopædia,’ and the ‘Penny Cyclopædia.’ He published ‘The Handbook of Ancient and Modern Sculpture’ in 1864, and several pamphlets. ‘Outlines to Illustrate a Moral Allegory, entitled “The Fighte of Freewille,”’ eight plates, engraved from Westmacott's designs, with descriptive text, appeared in 1839.

Westmacott retired from the Royal Academy about a year before his death, which took place at 1 Kensington Gate, Hyde Park, on 19 April 1872.

[Redgrave's Dict. of Artists; Sandby's Hist. of Royal Academy, ii. 197; Royal Academy Catalogues.]"



66. A FAUN WITH CYMBALS.

Statue. Life size.

Seated figure ; the statue in marble was executed for the Duke of Devonshire.


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67. AN ANGEL WATCHING.

Statue. Life size.

Part of a large monumental composition. The original marble of this grand and simple figure was executed for Lord Ashburton. Sacred subject.


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67*. DAVID.

Statue. Life size.

A conqueror of Goliath.


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68. VENUS AND CUPID.

Group. Life size.

Venus carries her mischievous son on her back slung in her girdle.


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69. VENUS INSTRUCTING CUPID.

Bas-relief.

Venus instructs Cupid to take on himself the form and features of the boy Ascanius, and in this disguise to fire the heart of Dido with an unconquerable love for Aeneas.


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70. VENUS AND ASCANIUS.

Bas-relief.

The goddess then takes up Ascanius, conveys him, sleeping, to her Idalian bowers, and keeps him there till Love has accomplished the purposed fraud. Ascanius wears the Phrygian cap proper to those who inhabited the plains of Troy.

Both subjects were taken from Virgil (Aeneid. B. i. 935), and form a pair. They were executed in marble for the earl of Ellesmere. Classical style.


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71. “GO AND SIN NO MORE.”

Bas-relief.

The subject is taken from John viii, 11. Sacred subject.


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72. PAOLA AND FRANCESCA.

Bas relief.

The subject is taken from the fifth canto of Dante’s Inferno, where Paolo Malatesta, and Francesca di Rimini, who had sinned together, are swept along in the region of eternal woe by a perpetual whirlwind,-

“No hope to them can ever comfort bring,
Either of rest or lesser punishment.”

This bas-relief was executed in marble for Lord Landsdowne.


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Dimensions
Width:192cm Height:138cm Depth:cm

http://www.jamesgraham-stewart.com/emai ... 212&mode=1
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:24

RICHARD [James] WYATT.

1795 – 1850

Richard Wyatt, born in 1795, in London. He studied first under the statuary, Rossi; in 1821 went to Paris and studied for a short time under Bosio. He then proceeded to Rome, and placed himself under the direction of Canova; here he found Gibson, and a close friendship took place between them, which no rivalry afterwards disturbed. Wyatt continued to reside at Rome for nearly thirty years, devoted to his art, living a life of tranquil retirement, and working from early morning till late at night. His character as a man was gentle and amiable; he died of a sudden attack in May, 1850. Several of his works were in the Great Exhibition of 1851, and the prize of sculpture was, on that occasion, adjudged to him, though dead. His great merit consists in the treatment of the female figure ; in softness and finish of execution he nearly equals Pradier, and in purity and delicacy of sentiment far excels him. All his works are classical in subject and conception, with a touch of modern sentiment and feeling in the treatment.


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73. INO AND BACHUS.

Group. Life size.

She is seated, and the boy-god, who had flung himself; against her knee, is looking up in her face. Clusters of grapes are near them. When Bacchus lost his mother Semele, he was confided by Zeus (Jove) to the care of Ino, his aunt, who nursed him tenderly, and fed him with grapes; after her death Ino was rendered immortal by her divine nursing, and worshipped as a sea-nymph under the name of Leucothea. Another treatment of this subject may be remembered in the beautiful group by Foley. Classical.


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74. CUPID AND THE NYMPH EUCHARIS.

The subject is from Fenelon’s Telemachus. Cupid is sent by Venus to inspire with love the nymphs of Calypso. Euncharis, seated, appears to listen to his beguiling words.


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75. A NYMPH.

Statue. Life size.

She sustains her drapery with both hands, the upper portion of the figure being undraped. Classical.


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76. A NYMPH ENTERING THE BATH.

Small life size.

She is drawing her drapery from her left arm, holding in her left hand the girdle she has just unclosed ; she looks down, contemplating the stream at her feet ; behind her (and serving to sustain the figure0 is a vase, which is the appropriate accessory. Exceedingly elegant in conception and treatment. The original marble was executed for Lord Charles [vere] Townshend [1785 – 1853]. At the sale of Lord Charles Townshend’s effects, in May 1854, this beautiful statue was sold for 410 guineas, and is said to have passed into the possession of Baron Rothschild.


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77. A NYMPH ABOUT TO BATHE.

Statue. Life size.

The same subject as preceding, but differently treated. She also sustains her drapery, and steps forward, just touching the water with her left foot. Classical.


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78. A HUNTRESS.

Statue. Life size.

Probably one of the attendant on Diana, the divine huntress; she holds in one hand a leveret, in the other a bow ; a beautiful and animated conception, both in the face and the movement. Classical.


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79. A NYMPH OF DIANA.

She holds a leveret in her left hand ; with her right she repels a greyhound. The marble statue was exhibited in 1850. The subject is classical, but the attempt to give texture (as here of the hide of the dog and the leveret), makes the treatment verge on the picturesque.


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80. ZEPHYR WOOING FLORA.

Group. Life size.


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81. A SHEPHERDESS WITH A KID.

Statue. Small life size.

She is seated, holding flowers with her right hand, while with the left she repels a kid, which is climbing to her knee to reach them.



82. PENELOPE.

Statue. Small life size. Standing.

She stands looking down at the dog Argus ; the right hand sorrowfully pressed to her heart ; in the left she holds the bow of Ulysses.

The passage of the Odyssey which suggested this fine statue is to be found in book xxi, where Penelope, still grieving over the absence of her heroic husband, but beset by dangers, proposes to her suitors to bestow her hand on him who should send a shaft from the bow of Ulysses through twelve rings in succession. Classical style. Very beautiful and antique in conception, with all the repose, and perhaps more of sentiment than the Greek artists would have given.

This statue was executed in marble for the Queen, and is now in the private apartments of Windsor Castle.


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Casts #80 and #82 in the South Nave. The German Portrait Gallery behind, and beyond that the English and German Sculpture Court.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:26

FRENCH SCULPTURE


CHRISTOPHE - GABRIEL ALLEGRAIN.
1710 - 1795

Christophe – Gabriel Allegrain, born at Paris, 1710 ; the time in which he flourished (the reign of Louis XV.) was an age of the most depraved taste in art, when the works of Pigalle were supposed to vie with those of Phidias. Allegrain was patronised by Madame Du Barry; he died in 1795.


83. VENUS AT THE BATH.

Statue. Life size.

Seated figure, almost undraped ; a very perfect example of what we call French grace, in the Louis Quinze style : dated 1767. From the Gallery of Modern Sculpture in the Louvre, at Paris.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:27

JEAN AUGUSTE BARRE

1811 – 1896

83*. BACCHANTE.

Statue. Life size.

She is crowned with ivy ; the panther, sacred to Bacchus, is at her side. The attitude and the air of the head express a mixture of languor and inebriety. A classical subject, neither in a classical nor a pure style of art.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:28

FRANCIS JOSEPH BOSIO
1768 - 1845

Francis Joseph Bosio, born at Monaco in 1769, studied at Paris in the atelier of Pajou, and has since practised his art there, patronised and employed by Napoleon, and after the restoration, by Louis XVIII ; Member of the Legion of Honour ; Knight of the order of St. – Michel, and Baron. He died in 1846, and has left scholars who have attained a high reputation.



84. THE NYMPH SALMACIS.

Statue. Small Life size.

She was the presiding nymph of a fountain near Halicarnassus in Caria, which hahad the property of rendering weak and effeminate all who drank of its waters. She is here seated on the ground ; the attitude is ungraceful and unmeaning : the face and features bad. This statue, which ranks as a masterpiece of the artist, gives no high idea of his power.

The original in marble was in the Exposition of 1824 ; it was purchased by the French government, and placed in the gallery of the Luxembourg, at Paris. A classical subject ; style conventional and poor.


Image

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 12:30

PIERRE CARTELLIER
1757 - 1831

Pierre Cartelier, born at Paris 1757, died there in 1831. A sculptor of great reputation in his own country. By him are the bas-reliefs on the triumphal arch in the Place du Carrousel and the statue of Minerva, in the gallery at Versailles, is considered his masterpiece.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Cartellier

85. MODESTY. [La Pudeur]

Statue. Life size.

A female figure standing, and about to wrap her drapery around her, as if offended by intrusion ; a tortoise shrinking into its shell is at her feet, which completes the idea.

The original statue was executed in marble for the Empress Josephine, and stood in her boudoir at Malmaison. Classical, but rather too sentimental in style.

[Exhib 1808]


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In storage in Amsterdam.
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