Statues INSIDE the Crystal Palace.

The History of Sydenham from Cippenham to present day. Links to photos especially welcome!

Moderator: frenzarin

Statues INSIDE the Crystal Palace.

Postby tulse hill terry » 2 May 2010 18:32

THIS IS NOT A GUIDE TO THE SCULPTURE THAT WAS EXHIBITED AT THE GREAT EXHIBITION OF 1851.

IT IS OF THE SCULPTURE EXHIBITED AT CRYSTAL PALACE AT SYDENHAM FROM 1854 TO 1936 WHEN THE BUILDING WAS BURNT DOWN


EVEN MORE PICTURES TO FOLLOW.

Image
"THE CRYSTAL PALACE AS A WINTER GARDEN."

As you can see the Crystal Palace building, in which the Great Exhibition of 1851 was held, was proposed even before it closed, as a permanent fixture in Hyde Park. Paxton's initial idea was as a winter garden full of plants and statues - and lots of the paying public of course!

The idea for an exhibition to promote world trade had begun before the building had been thought of.

Joseph Paxton, who came up with the design used, was gardener to the 6th Duke of Devonshire, and had experience of building huge glass building to raise exotic plants, while the Duke was also creating at the same time an important collection of marble sculpture.

Image

Sculpture Gallery Chatsworth House

As Paxton came up with the original idea of a huge greenhouse, he naturally concieved of it in the future, containing more plants and statues!

He was only working for the Crystal Palace Company, [which transfered the building to it's permanent site in Sydenham] of which he was a director, but his thinking heavily influenced the design of the Palace at Sydenham.

Victorian sculpture is now extremely unfashionable, and few may be sorry that after the Sydenham building opened the statues started to migrate around the building, were packed away during the First World War, and completely disappeared during the fire of 1936.

All the statues described here, were present only in Sydenham in plaster casts, some had been copied in smaller porcelain and bronze versions and some never commisioned in a permanent material, and are now gone forever.

After the opening, it was natural that over the next 82 years only examples of the work British sculptors was added to the collection.

I have added all the later additions to the collection I can find, and anything added to the original text of the Handbook is in [square brackets]. Everything from other sources, later guidebooks and my own comments are not in comment boxes.

If anyone has information or images to fill the gaps - please feel free to add them on.



A

HANDBOOK

TO THE

COURTS OF MODERN

SCULPTURE

BY

MRS ANNA BROWNELL JAMESON

CRYSTAL PALACE LIBRARY

AND

BRADBURY & EVANS

11 BOUVERIE STREET LONDON

1854


INTRODUCTION

The following Catalogue of the works of art assembled in the Courts of Modern Sculpture, being intended for the public at large, has been made as clear and as comprehensive as was possible within the prescribed limits of space and time. If I venture to introduce it by a few prefatory observations, it is not for the purpose of dictating to those who assume in art the right of private judgement and of deciding to their own contentment what they like, and what the do not,- but in the first place, to explain the sense in which I have used certain terms, which otherwise might be misunderstood, ans secondly with a hope of leading the mind of the observer to certain considerations which may be suggestive of added pleasure, and a more refined and discriminating judgement; for unless we know what to require, we cannot do justice to the artist who has sought in his own way to meet our requirements.



We will begin with a definition.



The word SCULPTURE (from sculpo, to carve,) signifies whatever is cut or carved into shape. We apply the word technically to all the productions of the plastic or formative arts: that is to say to all imitations of natural forms fashioned out of any solid material, whether they be modelled in clay or wax, cast in metal or gypsum, carved in wood or ivory, hewn in stone or marble. And we distinguish the productions of sculpture considered as one of the fine arts under two divisions: in the first we comprise all insulated and complete figures single or grouped. These we call in a general way STATUES; they may be standing, seated, or recumbent. In the second division, we place all figures which are partly raised on a flat plane, which we style in a general way BAS_RELIEFS. But when we would describe accurately we distinguish between - I. BASSO-RELIEVO, or low relief, where the figures are slightly projected (as in No. 200. - II. MEZZO-RELIEVO, half-relief, where half the figure appears as if sunk in the block, and half above it (as in No. 226). - III. ALTO-RELIEVO, plein-relief, high-relief, where the figure is almost detached from the plane behind - standing out from it, though still not wholly detached from it (as in No. 172). In the mediaeval sculpture, and the modern imitations of it, we find a mixed style, in which all the three degrees of relief are used - and the figures in the background, being in very flat relief, those in the middle ground in half-relief, and those immediately in front in high-relief (as in No. 109).



Now itmust be evident to those who use their reason in the observation of works of art that Sculpture, dealing with forms in solid material, must be very different from Painting, which describes with lines and colours on a flat surface; that the aims of each art are distinct; that each has its capabilities, its limits, and its laws, and that these being founded on antural laws cannot be infringed with impunity. Coleridge defined painting as "a somewhat between a thought and a thing." Sculpture is a thought and a thing. Painting is not what it seems; sculpture is a reality: painting produces its effects to the eye by differences and varities of colour, by gradations of distance, by multiplied figures. Where sculpture pretends to such manifestations (as in some of the mediaeval and modern bas-reliefs) it is apt to wander beyond the legitimate bounds which truth and taste have assigned to it; and that which constitutes its essential excellence and real character is diminshed in proportion as it assumes the powers, and proposes to itself the aims of painting, an art which works with different means, and has a far wider range of imitation and representation than that commanded by the art of sculpture.



I have begun by this definition of what sculpture is, and what it is not, and have dwelt a little upon the distinction, because the first principle with which the observer must start, is this:- never to confound the laws and the objects of two arts so perfectly distinct as sculpture and painting, but to consider well the kind of pelasure and the kind of representation which he shall require from each.



One of the first considerations of sculpture is the MATERIAL. In modern times we use the same materials which were in use in ancient times; nor does it appear that we have improved on those mechanical processes which ensured completeness, beauty, and excellence of workmanship, though we have some scientific and mechanised inventions which have facilitated imitation and cheapened material; and with regard to material, we should observe that the management and capabilities of different substances are considerations of great importance; that figures which look well in one material do not look well in another; that metal requires a different treatment from marble, and is fitted for purposes where marble would be misplaced.



All the specimens of sculpture here (both ancient and modern), are casts made in gypsum (plaster of Paris), and the hard, opaque plaster is so differnt in effect from the delicate semi-transparent marble, which under the master-hand seems actually to soften into life, that, in judging of some admired works, this difference must be taken into consideration.



SIZE is another of the external conditions of sculpture, which must be well-considered. Many subjects which are extremely graceful and ornamental, of small size, become repulsive when enlarged. When a figure is rather above nature, we style it heroic, when much above the natural height, it is colossal. If a statue be half the size of life, or less, it is called a statuette. Some of the natique colossal statues may be diminished into statuettes, retaining their grace, and even their sublimity; but a subject originally concieved of a small size can seldom be enlarged to colossal dimensions.



The LOCALITY for which a statue is intended is also of great importance; whther for a church, a temple, a hall, a gallery, a room, a garden; whether for a high or low situation. A statue which is to be placed in the open air, or to enter into an architectural composition, or to form part of a sacred monument, or an historical memeorial, requires a different treatment from one which is to decorate a room in a palace. The Milo of Puget (No. 117) was placed in a bocage at Versailles; the Nymph (No. 168) in a public garden; the Angel (No. 67) in a church: all are calculated for height or distance. A central situation in a large space requires that the figure and attitude should display beauties in every point of view.



the management of bas-relief requires great skill, that neither the figures be too numerous not the lights too multiplied and broken, for then we lose distinctness. Simplicity therefore is one of the necessary conditions of a fine bas-relief. In modern times, Thorwaldsen and Gibson have perfectly succeeded in the classical bas-releif treatmet. No. 299 and N0. 26 are examples of exquisite adaption, in this style.



The compostions by Geefs from the life of St. Huber (no. 109) should be compared with these, as beautiful examples of a wholly different style - the rich pictorial treatment of Gothic sculpture - in which the differnt degrees of relief are blended.



The foregoing remarks apply to sculpture generally, whatever be the subject or style. We will now turn to more particular criticism.



When we contemplate a work of sculpture we first require to know what it represents; we ask waht it is that the artist has intended to place before us. Sculpture is much more limited in regard to SUBJECT than painting - a condieration we must carefully keep in view; for very frequently, a work of sculpture is displeasing, not from any fault in the execution, but because it represents that which is essentially unfitted for sculptural treatment. Tam O' Shanter and Meg Merrilies are admirable creations in their way, and well fitted for painting, but we are shocked at the idea of these figures in bronze or marble.



We should be able, in looking round these courts of modern sculpture, to designate the subject, its appropriate conception and artistic treatment.



The subject is classical when it is selected from the ancient mythology and poetry. Thus Cupid is a classical subject, whether treated a l' antique with Greek simplicity and consummate purity of taste (as in No. 23), or with modern sentiment (as in No. 122). There are writers who lay it down as a principle that sculpture should be confined to the same class of subjects, regarding all others as deviations into barbarism. this is a mistake which leads to formality and conventionialism. It is the ultra-conservatism of art. Whena sculptor, from a native taste, chooses classical subjects for his peculiar walk, he is right to follow out the bent of his own genius, but not to restrain within the same limits the taste and genius of others. On the other hand it is equally a mistake, and a much more vulgar mistake, to imagine that anything sculpture can do, it may do.



a man whose education and habits of life have never led him to form classical associations in art or literature, says very naturally, "I do not like your undraped gods and goddesses; I have no sympathies with them: what are Venus and Apollo to me? Why are we to be ever haunted with these symbols of a dead religion? Nature is not exhausted of her beauty. Life speaks to us through a thousand aspcts. Choose me out of these infinite manifestations something i can recognise as truth, something I can feel and understand!"



The educated man, the classical scholar, replies "It is well; - let us have truth in art by all means, but what is your truth, my friend, is not mine. A fact taken from the accidents of common life is not a truth of universal import, claiming to be worked out by head and hand with years of labour, fixed before us in enduring marble - in the immutable forms of sculpture. True, the gods of Hellas have paled before a diviner light; 'the great Pan is dead.' But we have all some abstract notions of power, beauty, love, joy, song, haunting our minds and illuminating the realities of life; and if it be the especial province of sculpture to represent these in forms, where shall we find any more perfect and intelligible expressions for them than the beautiful impersonations the Greeks have left us? It is not the sea-born venus, but beauty and love, and it is not Athena with thoughtful brows beneath her helmet, and aegis-guarded bosom, but womanhood armed in chastity and wisdom, - which stand before us; with these have we not sympathies strong, and deep, and pure? When will the enchanting myth of Psyche



'That latest born and loveliest vision far

Of all Olympus' faded hierarchy'-



ever grow old and worn-out to the fancy? Not while we have souls to love, to suffer, to aspire? To an English farmer, a plough biy in a smock-frock, guiding his team along the furrow, conveys the idea of agriculture. To the educated fancy all over the world the same idea is conveyed in a more universal sense, by the benign maternal Ceres, holding her wheat-sheaf. Which is the more beautiful? Half a century ago the fashion was all in favour of paganism in sculpture; now the popular feeling runs so against it that it gives rise to the most obvious absudities. Sculptors who have seized and worked out classical ideas are afraid to give them classical names; a figure of Orpheus is 'A Violin Player;' a Cupid and Psyche become 'A Boy with a Butterfly;' Apollo, as the hepherd, is 'A Boy at a Stile;' and instead of the 'Oread and Dryad fleet,' or Naidad of the stream, we have 'Nymphs preparing to bathe,' and these without number, in differnt degrees of drapery. Surely we are in a pitiful condition a to education, is such subterfuge be necessary or acceptable!"



In modern art a clasical subject is not always (or rather, is very raely) concived and treated in a purely classical style; far oftener the imitation of the antique manner degenerates into the cold or conventional - and what the French call "style academique," "style de routine." On the other hand, some of our modern artists have infused into the forms of the nacient mythology a sentiment and a significance which we do not find in Greek art - not differnt, but deeper - (as in No. 82 and No. 2190. This new version of some of the lovely Greek myths, when directed by high feeling and a just tatste, is capable of more variety than artists are aware of.



Opposed to classical subjects, we have in modern sculpture sacred subjects; so we call all those which are suggested by the venerated Scriptures, and it is not without reason that the people delight in such. In these days we should treat religious subjects religiously; an angel should resemble neither a nymph nor a Cupid. There is, however, no necessity, as some appear to think, that Scripture subjects should be reproduced in the early mediaeval style, in the imperfect or stiff forms which belonged to a past and undeveloped state of art, interesting in may ways, not only to the antiquary but to every thinking and religious mind. The Scripture subjects are few, which allow of a figure undraped or half draped, or that display of the beautiful min and the noble in human form which is the province of sculpture. there is , indeed, the figure of Eve for the female form; David as the Shepherd, and the Prodigal Son, for youthful beauty and pathos; and many such will be found here. It is a pity that statues of the Mother of our Lord should be (from unhappy religious dissensions) repudiated by so many Christians, for she is a beautirul sculptural subject. there is a Pieta here, by Rietschel (196), which, for tenderness and religious sentiment, will strike everyone, and it should be compared witht he earlier treament, as that of Michaleangelo in the renaissance Courts, and those of more ancient date placed in the Mediaeval courts.



But beyond the limits of classical art and sacred art, modern sculpture has still a wide range. the whole range of mdern poetry and history is around us to select from. SOme artists and critics are of the opinion, that, when a subject is chosen from a modern poem or cemmerates a modern personage or a modern event, it must, nevertheless, be expressed in the classical manner, and even draped in the costume of the Greek or Roman classical times. This appears to me a mistake: for we see many examples here that such a subject may be treated within the just limits of sculpture, yet concieved with a feeling wholly distinct from that which we recognise in Greek art. In the following catatlogue i have styled those subjects POETICAL - the word is not well chosen, perhaps, for what is art of any kind if not poetical? - but I could find no ther word to express those creations suggested by modern associations and poetically but not classically concieved. Dante's Beatrice (No. 31), Miltons Sabrina (No. 51), Spenser's Una (No. 5), are examples of poetic subjects which are neither classical nor sacred; they belong to romantic, in contradistinction to classical art. The taste of the sculptor and his knowledge of the capabilities of his art are shown in the choice of such modern subjects as are suseptible of chaste and elegant sculptural treatment - for all are not so.



There are many subjects here which cannot be designated as classical, or sacred, or poetical. They do not express an idea, they reather aspire to represent in a more dramatic way, and often with the assistance of accessories, certain characters, actions, scenes; such compositions I have termed PICTURESQUE because they merge on the domain of paintin; No. 94 and 46 are eminent examples. the taste of the present day runs in favour of picturesque and romantic subjects in sculpture, and of classical and sacred subjects treated with that picturesque sentiment (or sentimentality), which we owe to the Renaissance school.



Another class of subjects we may style monumental and historical; such are portrait statues, memorials of real events, sometimes treated with exact sculptural taste and simplicity, sometimes with all the pretensions of the picturesque. We have here striking examples of both, as in No. 29 and No. 92.



Strictly speaking, modern sculpture would comprise all that is not antique scxulpture. But for the purposes of critical discrimination, we divide the history of sculpture into five periods.



1. that which preceded the highest development of Greek Art, comprising the Egyptian, Ninevite, and Lycian remains.



2. What we call the "Antique," comprehneding all the sculpture of the Greek and Romans, down to the complete subversion of the Roman empire; that is from about 700 years before Christ, to the sixth century of our own era.



3. Mediaeval sculpture, comprehending all those productions of the art, which date from the sixth to the twelfth century. During this time we find sculpture schiefly in alliances with architecture,and almost entirely devoted to religious purposes. The examples which remain to us of this period we call Byzantine and Gothic: they are ofetn curious for their significance, and interesting from their sentiment, but as far as knowledge of art, or elegance of form is concerned, they must be pronounced crude.



4. The period which we style the Renaissance (revival) comprehends all the productions of sculpture from the revival of literature and art in the fourteenth tot he end of the seventeenth century. In the beginning of this time the art was strugglinh between a newly awakend admiration for the beautiful remains of antiquity, and an ignorance of the principles on which they were produced. There was a leaning to the picturesque and Gothic in style, redeemed by exquisite grace and elevated feeling, and often by an elborate elegance of execution. But by degrees, as the real spirit of antique art was misapprehended, and imitation of nature was neglected, and even contemned, the tatse became more and more mistaken and depraved, and reached its utmost point of caprice and degradation in the works of Bernini and his followers, towards the close of the seventeenth century.



The observer will find in the various Courts of Architecture and Sculpture, - Assyrian, egyptian, greek and Roman, Byzantine, Mediaeval, Renaissance - specimens of all the periods here mentioned, from the human-headed bulls of Nineveh, down to the "Nymph of fontainebleau."



5. Modern sculpture (to which we are limited in this Handbook), dates from the close of the seventeenth century to the present time [1854]; but till the middle of the eiteenth century, and even later, the influence of thelate Renaissance school, more or less modified by national or individual influences, reigned paramount. A style at once pompous and fantastic, that of Louis-Quatorze, pervaded the arts of Eurpoe. In the beginning of the last century there were no schools or ateliers of sculpture but the French. the most celebrated was that of Pajou. Between 1700 and 1750 we find, in england, Rysbrach (a Fleming) and Roubilliac (a Frenchman), in possession of all the patronage of the country. In France, Pigalle, Falconet, Lemoyne, and Slodaz, carried as far as possible what we call the ""Louis Quinze" style. In Italy they had Corradini, who frittered away his undoubted talents in laboriuos frivolities.



Such was the state of things, when, in the middle of the last century, and within a year or two of each other, two men were born, destined, though each in a differnt way, to exercise an incalculable influence on modern sculpture. Their reception had been prepared by the critical essays of Winclemann, the founder of a new and purer code of taste and criticism, afterwards carried out by Lessing and Goethe. canova was born in 1752, and Flaxman in 1755. The first, a Venetian by birth, seems to ahve inherited that love of genial nature which distinguished the Venetian painters: hampered by the Bernini school in which he had been educated, and awakened to the comprehension of the antique art, we find him all his life struggling under these combined - sometimes opposite - influences, but never wholly emancipated into originality or truth. It is now just to Canova, to consider his faults in the light they appear to us now; they are, in a mitigated form, the faults which belonged to his time: compared with those who have come after him, hios mistakes and abberations of taste are apparent; compared with those who preceded him (such men as Corradini, Pigalle, Lemoyne), his tatste was pure and aims were noble. Canova was generally admired in his time as Bernini had been in the preceeding age, and exercised as wide a sway. But since his death his influence has declined; and in proportion as purer and more elevated principles of art have become better understood, his tendency to the picturesque, the sentimental, and the meretricious haas diminished the value of his works.



Far different has it been with our English [John] Flaxman [1755-1826]: he did not in his life-time rule the world of fashion nor of art; his work in marble are not numerous, for the patronage he recieved was in no9 respect commensurate with his merit; but he had early learned to understand and feel the principles of Greek sculpture, and his taste had never been vitiated by the florid inanities of the French school. His published outline compositions from the works of Homer, Aeschylus, and Dante, being spread all over Europe, and more especially in Germany, had a lasting effect in forming a new generation of artists.



[Bertel] Thorwaldsen was the next great name: arriving at Rome, an obscure young man, twenty years younger than Canova, and at a time when the great Italian artist had reached the highest pinnacle of his celebrity, he was never lisled by his example, nor subjugated by his influence; he held himself apart, not emulating Canova, but openly, and with a quiet power contending with him for the prize of excellence. it was remarked that whatever statue or ggroup, a l' antique, proceeded from the studio of Canova, Thorwaldsen soon produced his version of the same subject, in a spirit altogether different, as if in defiance; we can compare here the venus of Canova (no. 131) and the Venus of Thorwaldsen (No. 217); and it will be instructive to do so, to mark how the divinity of the latter transcends the fine lady graves of the former. the rival groups of "the Graces" should also be compared. some of the pupils of Canova have avoided his defect (affectation and prettiness), and carried his distinctive excellencies 9beauty of workmanship and classical elegance), far higher than he ever did, but no artist formed in the school of Thorwaldsen has ever surpassed or equalled him in the inventive poetry of his art: he excelled particularly in bas-relief, in which no modern sculptor but Gibson can be compared with him; there are many beautiful examples from both in this collection.



in looking over the Courts of Modern Sculpture, we cannot but be struck by some national charateristics. In the English school of art, with some brilliant exceptions, the general faults are negative, - a want of largeness of style, a poverty of invention, a want of fire and vigour in conception, and of elegance in execution, of which we have reason to be proud.



In the French school we are struck by the presence of all those merits in which we are most deficient, but there is a tendency to the capricious, the sensual, the meretricious, from which our own sculpture is entirely free. I remember in the Great Exhibition of 1851, being struck, as all were struck, by the wonderful elegance, fancy, and invention displayed in the French sculpture, including the ornamental bronzes - by the careful design and finished execution of the most minute, as well as the larger objects. but we were also struck by the predominance of the volutuous and the ferocious sentiment in some of their finest designs - the humane feelings, the moral sympathies, outraged on every hand. the appetite for sensation is as obvious in french art, as in their drama and literature; all react on each other.



In the German school we are struck by power and poetical feeling, and by a largeness of style, but also frequently by exaggeration and the want of grace and repose.



In the German school there are two schools of art of great celebrity. the berlin school, at the head of which is Rauch, has taken a direction towards natural and individual character, excelling in busts, portrait-statues, and what I have called the monumental and historical style, though not confined to these. the Munich school, which owns Scwanthaler as its chief, aims more at ideal representation and mythologic and poetic subjects.



In the best Italian examples there is much fire and poetry of conception and delicacy in the treatment; the faults most predominant in the Florentine and Roman schools are feeblenes and mannerism. it will be remarked that the Milan sculptors, who rank high in point of originality and talent, have taken a decided turn to the romantic and picturesque style of art.



In the English collection we have to regret the absence of any works of Flaxman, Chantrey, Banks, Foley, and some others. Among the French Sculptors, we miss bayre and Henri de triqueti. Among the Italian names we do not find that fo Tenerani. but we trust to see all these represented here in due time.



It has been necessary to ake some critical remarks: they have been made reluctantly, but most conscientiously. It was the request of the Directors [of the Crystal Palace Company] that this Catalogue should serve as a guide in some respects to the public taste. Therefore it is that the few criticisms which have been made, apply to the works of sculptors of eminent talent and established fame – for only criticism illustrated by such examples can be just, merciful, or useful – and it is ventured here with a deep feeling of responsibility, and of the true interests of art and artists. In none of the fine arts does such an amount of ignorance prevail as in sculpture. It is a universal complaint with sculptors, that they are forced to deviate from their own convictions of the true and the beautiful, to please the unrefined taste of patrons. Let those who wish to learn, come where: such materials for comparison and delightful contemplation were never before brought together to educate the mind and eye of the oublic.



Several works of Sculpture have arrived too late for insertion in this edition: other only just in time to be named, but not described or illustrated. All these will be noticed at length.



NOTICE



The works of each sculptor will generally be found grouped together, as nearly as has been possible.



The principle works of Gibson, and of those artists of the English school who have studied or resided at Rome, including Wyatt, Macdonald, Crawford, Spence, and Theed, will be found arranged round the western end of the Great Central Transept.



The works of Bacon, Baily, and Lough, are placed at the south end of the Nave. In this part of the Nave, and nearer the Great Transept, are placed various works of the English and German schools: the English, on the east or garden-side; the German, on the west, or road-side.



On the right of the Great Transept, as we enter from the west, is the court of German and English Sculpture, where besides the colossal Franconia, and the head of Bavaria, will be found a collection of Bas-reliefs by Thorwaldsen, Schwanthaler, Gibson, &c.



Opposite to this court, on the Garden-side, is the Court of Italian and French Sculpture, including the works of Monti, Rosetti, Dantan, Fraikin, Pradier, &c.



NOTE



The Modern Sculptures are numbered with black figures.

The Busts in the Portrait Gallery with red figures.

The Sculptures in the Greek and Roman courts with blue figures.



Image
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 17 Apr 2011 14:16, edited 12 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 2 May 2010 18:36

ENGLISH SCULPTURE


GEORGE GAMMON ADAMS

1821 - 1898

Image

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/speel/sculpt/adamsgg.htm

ANCIENT BRITON AS A SCOUT - 1844

Image

Image

MURDER OF THE INNOCENTS



To the left, outside the Foreign Industrial Court.

Image

A clearer view of another cast at the International Exhibition 1862, South Kensington.
Image

MUSIC'S MARTYR

Image
ART JOURNAL
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 7 Apr 2018 22:20, edited 10 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 2 May 2010 18:47

JOHN BACON

1740 – 1799

John Bacon was born in Southwark, 1740, of poor parents. He was apprenticed to a potter, and learned to model in clay, birds and beasts, and little figures, such as used to be sold for ornaments and playthings. From this humble occupation he rose by genius and industry to eminence and to riches. He received, in 1769, the first Prize for sculpture, and produced the next year a statue of Mars, carefully modelled and correct ; and being the best thing which had been produced by a native English artist, it gained him great celebrity. But bacon was not by nature or education formed to succeed in the classical or ideal. His portrait statues are far superior, particularly those of Dr Johnson, and Howard the Philanthropist, now in St. Paul’s. Bacon was patronised by George III. Besides being an eminent sculptor, he was an eloquent Methodist preacher. He died in 1799.



1. WILLIAM PITT “THE GREAT LORD CHATHAM."

Statue. Above life size.

The monument to Lord Chatham, in Westminster Abbey, “represents him in the attitude of an orator, extending the sway of Britannia, by means of Prudence and Fortitude, over earth and Ocean.” The figure of Chatham is really fine, and the compliment which Cowper paid to it

“Bacon there
Gives Chatham’s eloquence to marble lips”

Not wholly misplaced or undeserved. The great statesman and orator seems in the act of addressing the House of Lords ; the allegorical ladies who form part of the monument, and spoil it by affectation and mannerism, are here omitted. This is not a cast from the marble, but the original model from which the marble was worked, which adds to its value.

Monumental statue, in the picturesque style.


Image

2. DR JOHNSON

Statue. Heroic size.

The original model for his monument in St Paul’s. Portrait statue, classically treated.


Image

2*. THE ELEMENTS

Four Oval bas-reliefs.

A. Earth. B. Air. C. Fire. D. Water.

In a florid, ornamental style.


[img]
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 5 Apr 2018 15:32, edited 5 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 2 May 2010 18:59

EDWARD HODGES BAILY

1788 – 1867

Edward Hodges Baily, R.A., F.R.S. An artist of distinguished genius and merited celebrity. He was born at Bristol in 1788. He studied under Flaxman, and has much of his fine taste and manner both in ideal and monumental sculpture. One of his best known works is the “Eve contemplating herself in a Fountain,” of which there are many copies and repetitions.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Hodges_Baily

3. A NYMPH PREPARING TO BATHE.

Statue. Life size.

She is leaning, half undraped, against the trunk of a tree, a wreath of flowers, which she has just taken from her hair, hangs over her right arm ; in the left hand she holds her loosened girdle. Classical, in a fine large style of treatment.


Image
Image
Image

4. THE TIRED HUNTER

Statue. Life size.

Looking in an easy attitude of repose against the trunk of a tree, and looking down at his dog resting at his feet ; a hunting hound is on the left. The head has the air of a portrait. Classically and finely treated. These two companion statues were executed in marble for Joseph Neeld, Esq, M.P., and gained a medal in the Great Exhibition of 1851.


Image

Image
NEGRETTI & Zambra Stereoview. Source: http://thisuseless.blogspot.com/2011/04 ... unter.html


3A. SLEEPING NYMPH

Statue. Life size.

Executed in marble for Lord Monteagle.


Image


3B. THE GRACES

Group. Life size.

Seated figures ; an original version of the subject. See No. 125


Image


3C. APOLLO DISCHARGING HIS BOW

Statue.

An early work of the artist.


Image


4A. MATERNAL AFFECTION

Group. Life size.

Executed in marble for Joseph Neeld, Esq.


Image


4B. EVE

Statue. Life size.

Gazing at herself in the fountain. The original marble is in the Philosophic Institute at Bristol.


Image

Image


4C. EVE LISTENING

Statue. Life size.

Executed in marble for Joseph Neeld Esq


Image

Image
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 6 Apr 2018 16:55, edited 9 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 2 May 2010 19:30

JOHN BELL

1812 - 1895

John Bell, born at Yarmouth, in Norfolk, studied in the Royal Academy, but never in Italy, nor under any master. Bell has distinguished himself by his models for art manufacture, and his designs for industrial and ornamental art. By him are four of the Colossal Statues on the Terrace. That of CALIFORNIA being particularly fine and animated. All the works of this sculptor display great talent, with a leaning to the ornamental and picturesque in style.


5. UNA AND THE LION

Group. Small life size.

The Una of Spenser’s “Faerie,” is the personification of Truth: she is accompanied and guarded by the lion, the symbol of generous Force or Strength. The antique conception of Truth is always unveiled for the same reason that the Graces are unveiled, and here she bears the lily, symbol of purity. It has been rather ignorantly objected to this beautiful composition, that Spenser’s Una is mounted on a white ass, the emblem of humility, and that the lion attends upon her ; but the ass is not a statuesque subject, and the artist has shown equal taste and wisdom in generalising the idea, and treating it with abstract fitness and grace. A criticism more reasonable points to the dove and the garland on the lion’s back, superfluous as accessories, and breaking the unity and simplicity of the lines. Small copies of this beautiful group in Parian, have rendered it familiar and popular. Poetical style, blending the sculptural and picturesque.


Image


5A. DOROTHEA

Statue. Life size.

She is seated by a fountain, in the disguise of a page. The subject is from Don Quixote. The original marble is in the possession of the Marquess of Landsdowne.


Image


6. THE EAGLE SLAYER

Statue. Larger than life.

A hunter aims an arrow at an eagle in its flight: he bends his bow, looking upwards. The lamb, which has been torn from the flock, lies at his feet. As a display of form, energetic and animated. Cast in bronze, and exhibited in 1851.


Image

Whole thread about this one sculpture here:

http://www.sydenham.org.uk/forum/viewto ... 09&p=41807

Image
DELAMOTTE


6A. JANE SHORE

Statue. Life size.


Image

Jane Shore to the right.


6B. THE MAID OF SARGOSSA

Statue. Life size.


Image


7. ANDROMEDA

Statue. Life size.

For the story of Andromeda, see No. 47/. The original statue, which was exhibited in bronze in the Great Exhibition of 1851, belongs to her Majesty, and adorns a fountain at Osborne. Classical style.

Dover p225


Image

Image


8. THE INFANT HERCULES

Statue. Life size.

In the act of strangling the serpent which had attacked him in his cradle.


Image


8A. THE BROTHER AND SISTER

Group.


Image

Image


9. SHAKESPEARE

Standing figure in an easy attitude ; indicating repose and reflection. A monumental-portrait statue.

[Exhibited 1851]


Image

ARMED SCIENCE - UNCATALOGUED

Image

WAR - UNCATALOGUED

From the Wellington Monument in the Guildhall London.

Image
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 7 Apr 2018 23:18, edited 12 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:17

CHARLES BELL BIRCH

1832 - 1893

The work of this sculptor seems to have entered the collection of the Crystal Palace by 1900, perhaps after the death of the artist in 1893 and possibly represents the best of what remained in the studio. All lost in the fire of 1936 of course.

Edit: His work was displayed in the Albert Palace in Battersea, till that closed.

Image

GODIVA

Image

THE YOUNG DICK WHITTINGTON. 1880

Image

Image

There was also the model for a water nymph with frogs, used as a fountain in Australia. I can't find the picture of it, by Talbot, at the Crystal Palace, but here's a link to an interesting article re it.

http://wandering-ninox.blogspot.com/201 ... nding.html

Image
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 5 Apr 2018 15:46, edited 11 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:18

JOSEPH BONOMI

1796 - 1878

The only pupil of Nollekens. He is of English birth, though of Italian parentage. Studied in the Royal Academy ; afterwards went to Rome, and being seized with an enthusiasm for Egyptian antiquities, betook himself to Egypt, and spent eleven or twelve years among the ruins of Thebes.

His intimate acquaintance with Egyptian art has been turned to account in the Egyptian Courts, where most of the sculpture and modelling has been executed under his direction, and in great part by his own hand.

In the Portrait Gallery are two busts modelled by Bonomi ; those of Northcote, the painter, and Prince Hoare.
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 17 Apr 2011 12:58, edited 5 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:21

WILLIAM BRODIE

1815 - 1881

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Brodie_(sculptor)

CORINNA - UNCATALOGUED

Image

Image

"About 1853 he went to Rome, where he studied under Lawrence Macdonald, and it was with the latter's assistance that he modelled "Corinna, the Lyric Muse", a work which Copeland reproduced in miniature in "Parian" four years later."

His best known work is probably of Greyfriars Bobby, Edingburgh.
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 6 Apr 2018 01:01, edited 4 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:24

FRANCIS LEGGATT CHANTREY

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/speel/sculpt/chantrey.htm

Image

Image

1817 UNCATALOGUED [The cast at the Crystal Palace, Sydenham, minus the marble base.]
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 6 Apr 2018 00:51, edited 6 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:25

THOMAS CRAWFORD

1814 - 1857

Thomas Crawford, an American sculptor of distinguished merit and reputation, now settled in Rome ; he was born at new York in 1814. His love of art induced him at an early age to place himself under the tuition of a carver in wood ; in 1834 he went to Italy and studied in the atelier of Thorwaldsen ; and in 1839 produced the first statue which introduced him to notice, the Orpheus. He has now a deserved celebrity in his won country ; his works are charming for elegance of conception and finished execution. I should say from what I remember of his works at Rome, that the productions exhibited here hardly do justice to his genius and reputation.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Crawford_(sculptor)

Image

10. FLORA

Statue. Life size.

There is a great deal of careful and elegant workmanship in this statue; but as a sculptural conception it is open to criticism on several grounds. The attempt to represent the figure unsustained is not happy, for the drapery has the appearance of being stuck against something, we know not what; and the perpetual repetition of the semicircular sail-like folds is rather monotonous. The rapidity of movement, and the action of the air, which is supposed to produce this effect, would have also deranged the hair, which should float back. The face is too grave for Flora, and does not harmonise with the sentiment of the figure; and finally the flowers, though beautifully executed are too heavy, and as accessories, too much a feature in the whole. It is a classical subject, treated rather too much in the Bernini style.


Image

Image
http://www.sydenham.org.uk/forum/viewto ... =10&t=5345

11. THE DANCERS.

Companion statues. Life size.

A. A little girl dancing ; she holds up her drapery with both hands, with a simple childish action, while she trips lightly forward. [also known as "Dancy Jenny"

B. A little boy standing with a tambourine, which he has just broken.

These two figures form a pair, and should not be disunited ; they are in very pretty contrast, as expressing gay and sorrowful childhood. Picturesque style.


ImageImage

12. SMALL MODEL.

Of a monument proposed to be erected to Washington, in the city that bears his name.


Image
The equestrian monument is in Richmond, Virginia, and the model can be seen in the foreground [in white] of this view of the English [speaking] and German Sculpture Court.

Thomas Crawford [listed as James in the Handbook] is the only sculptor whose response to being exhibited at Sydenham I have yet come across.

Evidently Crawford found a sketch - "not badly placed" - of his Richmond colussus on exhibition at the Crystal Palace, but it was erroneously labeled "Monument to Wahington Prepared to Be Erected at Washington by James Crawford of Rome." Crawford went on to report [in a letter of September 1855] that "the secretary was very polite regarding the blunder in my name." In addition "The 'Flora' is pretty [well] placed, but the 'Boy and Girl' are almost hidden by shubbery and i did not care to disturb them: they are not of importance enough."

Thomas Crawford American Sculptor. Robert Gale 1964
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 8 Apr 2018 00:13, edited 7 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:28

W. FIELDER.

12.* VENUS.

Statue. Life size.

A Dove at her feet ; an amateur production presented by the artist.


Image

Image
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 25 Jun 2014 11:26, edited 3 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:34

JOHN GIBSON R.A.

1790 - 1866

If we consider the length of time he has been before the public, and the number and beauty of his works, Gibson may now take rank as the first of our English sculptors. He was born in Conway, in North Wales, in 1791, the son of a landscape gardener. At a very early age he showed a disposition to imitative art, in which he was encouraged by an intelligent mother. When the family, in poor circumstances, removed to Liverpool, the boy was constantly observing and studying the prints in the shop windows, and then trying to reproduce what he admired. He was first bound apprentice to a cabinet maker (where he learned to carve in wood), then to an ornamental worker in marble, where he learned to model and use the chisel. He found an early friend and patron in Roscoe, the historian, by whose advice he was led to study such remains of Greek art as he could find in engravings or copies. At length his friends in Liverpool, struck by his talents, and interested by his amiable and modest character, entered into a subscription to send him to Rome. Furnished with a sum of money sufficient to maintain him for two years, and a letter to Canova, he set off for Rome in 1817. Canova received him with great kindness, assisted him generously; and after studying with him for three or four years, Gibson set up for himself in 1821. From that time the history of his life would be the enumeration of his works. He has constantly resided in Rome, where he has never been without employment. His first patron was the Duke of Devonshire, for whom he executed a group of Mars and Cupid; and his second, Sir George Beaumont, for whom he executed Psyche and the Zephyrs. Many of his beautiful works will be found here, and the remarks which will be made on them in due order, will assist the observer to an appreciation of his genius. A very noble and just tribute to this great artist, may be found in the dedication to Bulwer’s “Zanoni.” We may refer to it for the character of the man as well as the sculptor –the man whose noble ambition has never been depraved by the appetite for wealth or the appetite for praise;- the sculptor whose love of Grecian art has never betrayed him into servility or plagiarism. For a bust of Gibson, see Gallery of Portraits, 400.


Image


13. VENUS VINITRICE.

Statue. Life size.

This is a version of the Greek subject. She holds the apple. (See No. 132 and No. 217.)


Image


14. FLORA.

Statue. Small life size.

Half-draped, crowned with roses, and stepping forward with a rose in her hand. Classical.


Image



15. CUPID DISGUISED AS A SHEPHERD-BOY

Statue. Life size.

Charming for its elegance, archness, and simplicity. The original marble was executed for the hereditary Grand Duke of Russia ; again for the late Sir Robert Peel ; and it has been repeated by the artist at least seven times. Classical with a touch of modern sentiment.


Image


16. A WOUNDED AMAZON.

Statue. Larger than life.

The Amazons were a race of warlike women, who are said to have lived in the neighbourhood of Mount Caucasus in Asia Minor, and admitted no men into their society ; when threatened or oppressed, they defended themselves valiantly, and even invaded in their turn, the nations around them, and were often victorious. They were governed by a queen, and founded some of the most famous cities of Asia Minor ; among others, Smyrna and Ephesus. The Amazons figure conspicuously in Greek poetry and art. They are always represented with the Phrygian bonnet, proper to the inhabitants of Asia Minor, and the short tunic.

There is a beautiful antique statue of a wounded and dying Amazon in the collection of Lord Landsdowne. This before us is a different version – the wound is not mortal. The idea of the attitude was taken from nature.

There is an Amazon in the Court of Greek Sculpture, which the observer will do well to compare with this. Classical style, with great originality, simplicity, and beauty in the conception.


Image


17. NARCISSUS.

Statue. Small life size.

The beautiful Thespian youth, who fell in love with the reflection of his own form in a fountain, fancying it the nymph of the stream. He is here represented as seated and bending over the liquid mirror in contemplation of himself. Classical.


Image


18. AURORA.

Statue. Life size.

Eos, the Goddess of the Dawn, is here represented as the Dispenser of Dew, winged, as is usual in Greek art, and crowned with the morning star ; she bears a vase in her right hand, and another vase is gracefully sustained by the left, and thus she steps forward as just risen from the waves which are at her feet. The original marble was executed for Mr. Henry Sandbach, who married a grand-daughter of Roscoe.


Image


19. VENUS AND CUPID.

Group. Life size.

Venus is half kneeling on the ground ; Love standing, fondly caresses his mother. Classical.


ImageImageImage


20. THE HUNTER.

Statue. Life size.

This fine statue represents a young greek hunter restraining his dog in a leash. The original marble, executed for the Earl of Yarborough, was in the Great Exhibition of 1851. Nude figure ; classical style.

“So stands the youthful hunter, marble life ;
In classic beauty true and true to nature ;
He like the conqueror of the Python looks
Beyond himself, on to his victory,
Not won, like the bright god’s, but yet to come,
And to his eye approaching. At his feet
See, eager for the chase with muscle strained
Against the arm that curbs him, the keen hound
In sight of Prey, arrested as he Springs !”

Mrs. Henry Sandbach


Image


21. PSYCHE BORNE BY THE ZEPHYRS.

Group.

When Psyche was exposed on a mountain to be devoured, as she supposed, by some evil demon, the Zephyrs, by command of Cupid, lift her up and bear her from the precipice, down into the valley of Bliss; she with a soft, innocent, half childish fear, trusts herself to their sustaining arms.

This beautiful airy group was an early work of the artist, and the first that brought him into notice ; it was modelled in the year 1821, and first executed in marble for Sir George Beaumont [Printer 1753-1827]; it has since been repeated for the hereditary Grand Duke of Russia, and Prince Torlonia, the Roman Banker.

Classical subject; poetical and original in treatment.


Image


22. HYLAS AND THE NYMPHS.

Group. Life size.

Hylas was a beautiful youth, who being sent by Hercules to fetch water from a fountain, so attracted the admiration of the Naiads (the nymphs of the stream), that they seized him, drew him down to the depths below, and he was never seen more.

The original marble is in the [Robert] Vernon Gallery. Classical style.


Image
Image


23. CUPID WITH A BUTTERFLY.

Statue. Life size.

Cupid standing, holds a butterfly in one hand, and is in act to draw an arrow from his quiver, with which to transfix it. This subject may have been suggested by the myth of Psyche, whose emblem was the butterfly ; but the statue properly represents Eros – divine love, and the butterfly is here the spirit, the human soul. The original marble was executed for Lord Selsea, and duplicates are in the possession of Mr. Richard [Vaughan] Yates and Mr. Holford. The artist himself considers this eminently beautiful statue as his finest work. Classical style, recalling the purest antique in the easy grace of the attitude, and the exquisite modelling of the forms.


Image


24. CUPID AND PSYCHE.

Bas-relief.

Psyche, reclining on a couch, while Cupid seated at her side, sustains her in a tender attitude. He is supposed to be unseen by her, and from the soft melancholy on her face, she appears to complain that he will not reveal himself. The original marble was executed for the Queen. Classical style.


Image


25. VENUS AND CUPID.

Bas-relief.

The mother-goddess is seated, and Love, climbing ion her knee, is caressing her. Classical style.


[img]


26. THE HOURS LEAD FORTH THE HORSES OF THE SUN.

Bas-relief.

According to the beautiful Greek myth, the Hours (Horae) were three sisters, Olympian divinities, daughters and ministers of Zeus ; they presided over the seasons ; it was their duty to guard the gates of Olympus, and to harness the divine horses to the chariot of Helios, (the sun) and to attend him in his course. This elegant group, which seems to float through ether, was executed in marble for Lord Fitzwilliam. Classical style.


Image


27. PHAETON.

Bas-relief. (The companion to the above).

Phaeton, the son of Helios (Phoebus or Apollo) was so presumptuous as to request his father to allow him to drive the Chariot of the sun across the heavens for one day. The god, having bound himself by an oath, was obliged to yield. The youth, too weak to guide the celestial coursers, had nearly set the earth on fire, when Zeus struck him down with his thunderbolt, and he fell from the skies into the river Eridanus. The story, told at full length by Ovid, has always been considered symbolical of rash ambition, and is a frequent subject of art.

“Meanwhile the restless horses neighed aloud.
Breathing out fire and pawing where they stood,
They spring together out, and swiftly bear
Th’ amazed youth, through clouds and yielding air.
With winged speed outstrip the eastern wind,
And leave the breezes of morn behind.”


Image


28. JOCASTA AND HER SONS.

Bas-relief.

Eteocles, the son of Oedipus, having obtained possession of his just share of the kingdom, who thereupon, fled, and, obtaining assistance from Argos, came up against Thebes with a large army. Jocasta, the mother of the two princes, with great difficulty obtained a truce and a meeting, and tried to reconcile her sons, but, from the violent and vengeful nature of Eteocles, failed in her endeavours. The two brothers afterwards slew each other in single combat. The scene which is taken from Euripides, is represented with true classical grace and simplicity.


Image


29. WILLIAM HUSKISSON.

Statue. Life size.

This statue of the great and lamented statesman who first opened the way to “free trade,” was executed by Gibson, in 1847, and presented to the city of Liverpool, in bronze, to the London Royal Exchange, in Marble by Mrs. Huskisson, the widow of the statesman. A portrait statue, in the classical style.


ImageImage

Original marble statue erected in Huskisson's Mausoleum in St James Cemetery, and pulled from it's base in 1968. It was "donated to the National Museums Liverpool collections by the Parks and Gardens Department, Liverpool City Council in 1968."
http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/cons ... tatue.aspx

ImageImage

A second completely different pose was used for a second marble figure, intended for Liverpool, diverted to the Royal Exchange in London, and moved in 1915 to Pimlico Gardens. a bronze copy of this second statue was erected in Liverpool, pulled down in the riots of 1981, and recently re erected in the middle of a new housing development.

Image
Image

Seems it was the second version at Crystal Palace, soon to be replaced by Lord George Bentinck by Thomas Campbell (Cavendish Square, London.)


30. GRAZIA. (THE ROMAN MODEL, A CAPUAN GIRL).

Bust.

This is the head of an Italian woman, a native of Capua, whose extraordinary and peculiar style of beauty, rendered her for many years a favourite model for the artists at Rome, particularly in those subjects which required a proud and stern expression ; the features have all that regularity and ideal grandeur which we see in the Roman goddesses. The neck and shoulders are not in harmony with the head, and appear to belong to another woman of a different character.


Image
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 6 Apr 2018 00:57, edited 18 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:37

JOHN HANCOCK

1825 - 1869

John Hancock was born at Fulham; he has pursued his art in London, has never visited Italy, and has studied under no master. His productions are distinguished by grace and originality of treatment.


31. BEATRICE.

Statue.

Beatrice Portinari, daughter of a noble Florentine, the young girl with whom Dante was in love in his early youth, and whom he has immortalised in his great poem, by making her the personification of beauty, wisdom and piety, and the presiding genius who at lengths conducts him to paradise. The conception of the figure as she stands now before us, is taken from a passage in the Purgatorio, (canto xxx.) ; Dante meets on the other side of Lethe, an allegorical procession representing the triumph of Faith, closed by the appearance of Beatrice ; he throws himself on his knees before her in tears and trembling ; she reveals herself to him, reproving him gently for his past errors. Her speech begins with the line happily chosen as the inscription on the pedestal,-

“Guardami ben; io son, io son, Beatrice!”

Look on me well; I am – I am Beatrice!

But the sculptor has with a true feeling and judgement in his art, generalised the idea ; so that this statue does not so much represent a particular moment or action, as it expresses a conception of character.

The original model was in the great Exhibition of 1851, and has since been executed in marble for Miss Burdett Coutts. [1814-1906]
[Currently lent anonymously to the V&A]


Image

Two small bas-reliefs – the first representing -

32. CHRIST’S ENTRY INTO JERUSALEM.


Image
26.75 x 66cm; 10½ x 26in and 27.5 x 69cm; 11 x 27in
http://www.woolleyandwallis.co.uk/Print ... tID=101026

The second -

33. THE PROCESSION TO CALVARY.

Exhibited in 1849, and executed in bronze for the Art Union of London.


[img]
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 5 Apr 2018 16:12, edited 4 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:38

ALBERT HEMSTOCK HODGE

1875 - 1917

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/speel/sculpt/hodge.htm
http://www.glasgowsculpture.com/pg_biography.php?sub=hodge_ah

BOY WITH VULTURE - [The Lost Bow]

Image
Regents Park London [url][/url]

ECHO AND NARCISSUS

?

BOY WITH DUCK - [The Mighty Hunter]

Image
Regents Park London http://www.flickr.com/photos/tommyajohansson/4505740859/in/photostream/
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 4 Apr 2011 19:03, edited 3 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:41

ADRIAN JONES

1845 - 1938

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrian_Jones

DUNCANS HORSES - 1892

Image

Plaster model in the ruins of the 1836 fire, moved to the Royal Vetinary Collge, Herfordshire, and finally cast in bronze fairly recently.
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 10 May 2010 15:28, edited 2 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:43

JOHN EDWARD JONES.

1806 - 1862



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Edward_Jones

33*. CHILDREN WITH A PONY AND HOUND.

Small Group.

[Exhibited 1851 Great Exhibition]


Image
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 21 Jun 2014 10:52, edited 3 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:45

JOHN LAWLOR.

1820 - 1901

John Lawlor, born in Dublin, and studied under Smith, an Irish sculptor of some reputation. He has never been in Italy, and carries on his profession in London.



34. THE EMIGRANT.

Statue. Small life size.

A young girl, leaning against part of a mast, with rope and pulley, (which express the ship) seems to gaze with a melancholy air towards the receding shore. This figure, which belongs to the romantic style of sculpture, will speak to many hearts at this time.


[img]


35. TWO BOYS WRESTLING.

Group.

The two boys are contending for a bird caught in a snare and lying at their feet ; the sentiment appears to be, that one boy wishes to set the bird free, and the other to keep it or kill it, which is discriminated by the expression in the two faces. Picturesque treatment.


Image


36. A BATHING NYMPH.

Statue. Small life size.

She is seated, endraped, on the edge of a fountain. The model of this elegant figure gained a prize medal in the Great exhibition of 1851 ; but it remains in the artists studio, and has not yet been executed in marble. Classical style.


Image ]

[1851 Dover p 301]

[Beaver p57]
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 5 Apr 2018 22:52, edited 4 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:47

JAMES LEGREW

1803 - 1857

James Legrew, born at Caterham, in Surrey ; a pupil of Sir Francis Chantrey.


Image

The works of sculptor James Legrew, who commited suicide, a few years after the Palace opened.

From left to right, "Massacre of the Innocents," "Musidora" and his "Samson" also exhibited at the 1851 Great Exhibition.

Going by view #40 Brian May's website this is sited between the Mixed Fabrics and Printed Fabrics Courts

37. SAMSON.

Colossal statue.

He stands, in the act of bursting his bonds. This statue is intended as a model of the athletic form in violent exertion. It is a fault that while the size and proportions suppose height and distance, the attitude is so contrived as almost to prevent the head and features from being seen. Exhibited in 1843. Sacred Subject, treated in the classical heroic style.



38. MUSIDORA.

Statue. Life size.

Preparing to bathe, she looks up alarmed and listening. The subject is from a well-known passage in “Thomson’s Seasons.” Exhibited in 1850.


Image

39. MURDER OF THE INNOCENTS.

Group. Life size.

The story expressed here very simply by a single group; a mother holding up her dead child and looking up, as appealing to heaven. The conception is pathetic, but there is nothing to identify the especial story. Exhibited in 1851. Sacred subject.


Image

"Massacre of the Innocents" by James Legrew, standing in the Greek Court - directly under the "LAM" of Lambeth.
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 5 Apr 2018 23:04, edited 5 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:50

JOHN GRAHAM LOUGH.

1789 - 1876

J.G.Lough, born at Greenhead, in Northumberland, began by studying from the Elgin marbles; then went to Italy in 1843, where he remained for four years, but has not studied under any master.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Graham_Lough


40. MILO.

Colossal statue.

Milo (or Milon) of Crotona, was a wrestler, celebrated for his gigantic form and great bodily strength, and not less for his tragic death. He had been six times crowned as conqueror in the Olympic, and as many times in the Pythian games; and on one occasion had carried off a bull upon his shoulders. On a certain occasion had carried off a bull on his shoulders. On a certain occasion, passing through a forest, he saw a tree which had been partially split by the wood cutters, and attempting to rend it farther with his fist, it closed upon his hand ; and thus caught, and unable either to escape or defend himself, he was held fast until devoured by the wolves. This is a subject often repeated in sculpture, as it gives an opportunity of displaying the figure fixed in position, yet in violent muscular action; but it is painful in sentiment, because of the hopelessness of the struggle.

The original marble was executed for the late Duke of Wellington. See (No. 101) another conception of the same subject by Falconnet, where Milo has been thrown to the earth and is attacked by a lion. Another famous Milo (No. 117) is the statue by Puget, in the Louvre. But the conception by Lough is far superior in statuesque simplicity and truth.


Image


41. SATAN.

Colossal Statue. Seated.

If the wings were taken from this statue, the bulky form would convey the idea of a Hercules in repose, or a Milo of Crotona. Milton’s Satan, though fallen, is still an angel, “nothing less than the arch-angel ruined.” His might is not corporeal, but spiritual. It is the union of amazing intellect and beauty and ethereal grace, with ambition, cunning, hatred, envy and despair, which make him such a poetical creation, and therefore a fit subject for art. This statue, though displaying the artist’s knowledge of form, cannot be said to be poetically treated.


Image


42. ARIEL.

Statue. Small life size.

The marble is in the possession of the Duke of Sutherland.


Image


43. TITANIA.

Statue. Small life size.


Image


44. PUCK.

Statue.

These two form part of a series of figures from Shakespeare, in the picturesque style. Executed in marble for Sir Mathew White Ridley, Bart.


Image

[Marble copy acquired by the V&A in the 1860’s.]


44*. DAVID

Statue. Life size.

Modelled in 1829. The original marble is in the possession of Earl Grey, at Howick [Hall, near Craster.]


Image


45. APOTHEOSIS OF SHAKESPEARE.

Bas-relief.

Intended for a frieze to ornament a gallery in which are placed several statues taken from Shakespeare’s works. The centre represents Shakespeare glorified.

On the right the drama of Macbeth is represented by a succession of groups,

1. the three witches meet Macbeth and Banquo ;

2. Macbeth after the commission of the murder ;

3. Lady Macbeth walking in her sleep ;

4. Birnam Wood removed to Dunsinane ;

5. Death of Macbeth. Macduff crowned by victory ;

6 the three witches and Hecate.

On the left the play of the Tempest is represented by a succession of groups,--

1. Caliban ; Ariel ;

2Prospero ; Miranda asleep ;

3. the shipwrecked mariners ;

4. the sleeping King, with the conspirators and Gonzales ;

5. Ferdinand and Miranda, with Prospero ;

6. the masque of Ceres and Iris.

Picturesque style. Executed for Sir Mathew White Ridley, Bart.


[img]


46. THE MOURNERS.

Group. Life size.

A dead warrior lying on the earth is mourned over by a desolate female figure. His horse stands by with head dropping. Picturesque style.


Image
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 5 Apr 2018 23:16, edited 10 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 11:53

LAWRENCE MACDONALD.

1799 - 1878

Laurence Macdonald sic, a Scotchman by birth, has long been settled at Rome, and has attained to great eminence in his profession ; he is particularly celebrated for his busts, of which there are many fine examples in the Portrait Gallery here.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Macdonald


47. ANDROMEDA.

Statue. Life size.

She was the daughter of Cepheus, King of Ethiopia ; her mother Cassiope boasted that her beauty surp[assed that of the Nereids, for which contempt the Nereids, offended, prevailed on Poseidon (Neptune) to send an indunation, an a sea monster, to ravage the country. The oracle, having been consulted, replied, that these calamities should cease if Andromeda were delivered to the monster, and Cepheus was obliged to yield to the wishes of his people. She was accordingly chained to a rock on the shore, and would have been devoured if Perseus had not rescued her. Mounted on his winged horse he slew the sea monster, and afterwards claimed Andromeda for his bride. The scene of this story is by some authors placed near Joppa, on the coast of Phonecia ; it was a favourite theme with the Greek poets and artists ; and as it gives the opportunity of displaying the undraped female form in may varieties of attitude, with the association of a well-known pathetic story, it has often been repeated in modern times. This is a felicitous version.

The original marble was executed for the Marquess of Abercorn.
Classical style.

[1st Duke 1811-1885 Bentley Priory till 1846.]


Image


48. ULYSSES.

Statue. Heroic size.

Ulysses recognised by his dog Argus. The king of Ithaca, so distinguished by his wisdom and exploits in the Trojan war, was condemned, by the enmity of Venus, to many years of trials and wandering before he reached his native shore ; and his adventures form the subject of Homer’s second great poem, the Odyssey. It is there related that Ulysses, on returning to Ithaca, in the disguise of a beggar, passed unheeded and unknown to all except his old and faithful dog Argus :-

“He knew his lord, he knew and strove to meet;
Soft pity touched the mighty master’s soul,
Adown his cheek a tear unbidden stole,
Stole unperceived.” – Odyssey, B. xvii.

This is a very fine statue, in the classical style, remarkable for dignity and pathos, and for a far deeper sentiment in the features than is usual in genuine Greek art; this is owing, perhaps, to Macdonald’s experience in rendering countenance. The original marble was executed for Sir Arthur Brooke [1779–1845 knight physician to the forces.]


Image
Last edited by tulse hill terry on 21 Jun 2014 10:58, edited 4 times in total.
tulse hill terry
 
Posts: 686
Joined: 25 Jun 2007 01:33
Location: sarf lunnen

Next

Return to Town Museum & Gallery

 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest