Statues INSIDE the Crystal Palace.

The History of Sydenham from Cippenham to present day. Links to photos especially welcome!

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:04

JAMES PRADIER
1790 - 1852

James Pradier, born at Geneva in 1794, studied at Paris under Lemot, died at Paris in 1852. The fame of this accomplished sculptor rests principally on the success with which he represented the undraped female figure, and the exquisite softness and delicacy with which he worked the marble. In this he has far exceeded Canova, but has also exceeded him in the leaning to the sensual and the meretricious in sentiment. His statue of Phryne, the Athenian courtesan (which was in our Great Exhibition of 1851), was a signal example of his highest merit and his greatest defects.


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116. VENUS DISARMING CUPID.

Group. Life size.

Kneeling on one knee, she takes his bow from him while he leans against her. Classical subject. From the combination of the figures it seems to be fitted for a certain space or locality ; the treatment of the flesh, and modelling of the forms, particularly in the figure of Cupid, most skilful.


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SOURCE: DELAMOTTE - 116 on the right.

116*. A CHILD

Recumbent figure.

It appears to be a monumental figure, and to represent one of the Orleans family.


http://www.wikiphidias.fr/images/storie ... rleans.jpg

This is of Françoise Louise Caroline d'Orleans (1816-1818), from her tomb at Chapelle Royale de Dreux

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chapelle_royale_de_Dreux

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THE TOILET OF ATALANTA.

Exhibited 1851 Paris Salon.

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SOURCE: GUILDHALL LIBRARY LONDON
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:05

PIERRE PUGET.
1620 - 1694

Pierre Puget (who belongs rather to the late Renaissance than to the modern school) was born at Marseilles in 1622, and died there in 1694. His father was a carver on wood, employed in the docks, and so poor that he could do little or nothing for his son. Young Puget, self-educated, and full of genius and energy, set off on foot for Italy, in his seventeenth year; reached Florence, where he struggled for a time with poverty and want, but at last attracted the notice of Pietro da Cortona, the fashionable painter of that period, and under him made his first studies in painting, and betook himself to sculpture, architecture, and ship-building. His life from this time was active and prosperous ; his industry, his energy, his variety of talent, were wonderful ; but in all he did, his taste, his style, were those of the time, verging on the theatrical, the false, the exaggerated. One of his best works is the St. Sebastian in the Church of the Carignano, at Genoa. Puget was patronised by Louis XIV., but, independent and virtuous in his habits and principles, he preferred working in his native town to encountering the jealousies of the court. The French, who are justly proud of him, style him the Michael Angelo of France ; but the title has not been confirmed by the voice of Fame.


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117. MILO OF CROTONA.

Colossal Group.

This celebrated statue was modelled and executed in marble at Toulon, in 1683, while Puget was employed in the dockyards there, in designing poops and figure-heads for the royal galleys. It is the earliest attempt in modern sculpture to step out of the tame conventional affectations of the time, into the tragic, the terrible, the dramatic ; and in this respect it is remarkable ; the forms are correct, and the action of all the muscles expressed with astonishing energy ; but it is painful in proportion as it is expressive, and too picturesque and theatrical in the treatment. It obtained unbounded admiration at the time, was sent to Paris, placed by Louis XIV in the gardens at Versailles ; and the artist munificently recompensed. It is related, that when the statue arrived at Versailles and was taken out of its case in presence of the King and the court, the queen covered her eyes, exclaiming, “Ah! le pauvre homme!” an exclamation, which those who look on it here will be inclined to repeat. The story of Milo has been already told (see No.s 40 & 101).

According to the Greek tradition, he was attacked by wolves, and Lough, in his statue, has adhered to this fact. Falconnet and Puget have adopted the lion, as capable of more noble and sculptural treatment. In this group, the lion springing on the defenceless man from behind is neither sculptural nor natural, but twisted like a snake. After remaining in the garden of Versailles for more than a hundred years, the group of Milo has lately been removed to the Louvre, where it now stands. A classical subject, in the picturesque style.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:05

ETIENNE JULES RAMEY.
1796 – 1852

Etienne Jules Ramey, the son of a sculptor, born 1796 ; studied unser his father, at Paris ; obtained in 1815, the Great Prize (Le Prix de Rome), and the work which first gained him notice was the statue exhibited here. His best work is the group of Theseus and the Minotaur, in the Tuileries Gardens, but it is not very good. He died in 1852.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne-Jules_Ramey

118. INNOCENCE.

[L'Innocence pleurant un serpent mort. Salon de 1822.]

Statue. Small life size. [1822]

Represented here as a young girl bewailing the death of a snake. Classical, but feeble and sentimental in conception and treatment.



Court of French and Italian Modern Sculpture. Could #118 be the figure on the far right?
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:06

ITALIAN SCULPTURE

CINCINNATO BARUZZI

1796 - 1878

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cincinnato_Baruzzi

VENUS - UNCATALOGUED

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EUTURPE - (the muse of music - she's lost her triangle) - UNCATALOGUED

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http://www.iguidez.com/Bologna/villa_baruzzi/
Villa Baruzziana - Bologna
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:09

LORENZO BARTOLINI.
1777 – 1850

Lorenzo Bartolini, a Florentine sculptor, whose studio was well known to English travellers, by whom he has been much patronised. He studied first at Paris, where he gained the Great prize in 1803. His works are numerous, particularly his busts. He is lately dead.


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119. VENUS.

Statue. Life size.

She stands, looking down, and sustaining her drapery in her left hand. The original marble is in the Pitti Palace at Florence.


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SOURCE: http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/LX/VenusL ... lini1.html

120. A GIRL PRAYING.

Statue. Life size.

Female kneeling figure, completely undraped.


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121. CHARITY

Group. Larger than life.

A female figure carrying an infant on her arm, while she is instructing a child walking by her side. The original marble is in the Pitti Palace at Florence.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:11

GIOVANNI MARIA BENZONI

1809-1873

G. M. Benzonni, of Bergamo in Lombardy, but residing in Rome.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Maria_Benzoni

122. CUPID DISGUISED IN A LAMB’S SKIN.

Small. Life size.

In the picturesque style ; and as an ornamental statue, very elegant and well executed.


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123. DIANA.

Statue. Life size.

Her bow in one hand, an arrow in the other, and attended by a dog. A common-place ornamental treatment of the subject.


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They have a copy at the V&A caff, bought at the 1862 International Exhibition.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:13

LUIGI BIENAME
1795 - 1878

Residing in Rome.


"Luigi Bienaime(1795-1878) won the Prize at the Accademia di Belle Arti e Liceo Artistico in Carrara and then left for Rome where he entered the studio of Bertel Thorvaldsen. By 1827, he was in charge of the Academia Nazionale di San Luca. During his tenure in Thorvaldsen's studio, Bienaime became a popular exponent of his master's style and often finished many of his pieces. This may explain the inclusion of Thorvaldsen's and Bienaime's names on the inscriptions. The studio became an important center for the production of sculpture and a frequent stop for foreign visitors. " Source: Sotheby's

124. PSYCHE.

Statue. Life size. Marble.

She stands, holding the dagger and lamp in her right hand, and with her left shading her face from the light ; the moment represented in that in which she is about to slay her husband, Cupid. Classical.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:15

ANTONIO CANOVA

1757 - 1822

Antonio Canova was born at Passagno, a little village in the Venetian territories ; and it is worthy of remark, that this insignificant hamlet, which before this time was not to be found in any map of Italy, now finds a place on almost every map. The parents of Canova were peasants, on the estate of Count Faliero, and the first proof he gave of his turn for art, was the model of a cow in butter, for the table of the count. His patron sent him to Venice, to study in the academy there. He gained, in a few years, the highest prize for sculpture, and was sent to Rome, in 1774, with a pension of 300 ducats. He had already modelled the group of Daedalus and Icarus, and on his arrival at Rome he produced, in clay, the group of Theseus and the Centaur. These works were not only full of promise, but in reality surpassed anything that had been produced for a long time. From the year 1783, his fame may be said to be established. In 1802, he was summoned to Paris by the Emperor Napoleon, whose bust he modelled, and he afterwards executed the colossal statue of the Emperor, which has since become the property of the Duke of Wellington. In 1815, he was again in France, with the title and honours of ambassador from the Pope, to reclaim the works of art which had been carried off from Italy by the French. On this occasion he visited England, and was consulted on the value of the Elgin marbles. He received at the same time commissions from the Prince Regent (George IV.), and from many of our nobility. On his return, the Pope created him Marquis of Ischia. In the later years of his life, Canova became extremely religious, and devoted a large portion of his fortune to the erection and decoration of a church in his native village ; ha also modelled a colossal statue of religion, which he presented to the Pope, for the purpose of being placed in St. Peter’s, at Rome. There was, however, something in the conception of this statue which did not please, and the cardinals were opposed to its being placed in the church. The sculptor, offended, sold all his property in the Roman States, and withdrew to Venice, where he spent the rest of his life, occupied with the decoration of his church at Passagno. He died at Venice in the year 1822. In the beginning of this century, Canova’s reputation was unrivalled ; he was styled the Phidias of his time ; but his claim to this supremacy is now disputed. It is generally admitted that the want of severity and purity of style in his classical subjects, and of deep feeling in his religious works, place him on a lower grade than that which he held in his lifetime. His faults are a leaning to the picturesque and sentimental, which degenerated in many instances into mannerism and affectation ; his women never look modest, and his men scarcely ever look manly. His chief merits consist in the softness and delicacy with which he worked the marble, and an attention to correct natural forms which had not been usual in the artists of the last century. By passing in review those of his works collected here (which are among his most celebrated), and comparing them with those of others, we shall perhaps be able to arrive at a just appreciation of his genius. They are all classical subjects (with one exception, the Magdalen). The style, too, is what is usually called classical, a mingling of the antique with the mannered sentimentalism of the Bernini school.


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125. THE THREE GRACES.

Group. Life size.

The Graces, styled by the Greeks the Charities, were three lovely sister goddesses, whose names were Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne. They presided over beneficence, good temper, and all the kindly feelings, which express harmony of soul. They were the daughters and constant attendants of Aphrodite (Venus), to show that beauty should be accompanied, not only by grace of person, but grace of mind ; and as grace of mind supposes a cultivated intellect, they were the chosen companions of Apollo and the muses, and were worshipped in the same temple. We are told that in the earliest times the Greeks represented the Graces or Charities as veiled, to express their modesty, but afterwards to express their innate putrity and sincerity, they were required to have the attributes of innocence and truth, that is, they were to be represented without any drapery, disguise, or ornament of any kind. The observer will feel that Canova has departed from the purity of sentiment suggested by the exquisite Greek allegory ; that the expression of grace is here outward rather than inward, and in fact verges on the conscious, the artificial, and even the affected.

The original marble group was executed for the Empress Josephine, and after the overthrow of Napoleon, was purchased by the Duke of Bedford. There are many repetitions, one of them in the possession of the Queen.


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126. VENUS AND ADONIS.

Group. Life size.

Without going into the famous allegorical myth of Aphrodite and Adonis, which is of Asiatic origin, it is only necessary to recall here the Greek legend. Venus, more properly Aphrodite, loved the beautiful youth Adonis, and endeavoured in vain to detain him in her arms from the chase, wherein he was killed by a wild boar. The sculptor has represented the parting of the lovers : Adonis holds the Goddess half embraced, while she seems to plead in vain.

The original marble group, a subject well suited to the genius of Canova, and certainly one of his finest works, was executed for the Marchese Berio of Naples, and after his death came into the possession of Signor Favre di Ginerva, also of Naples.


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127. ENDYMION.

Statue. Life size.

He reclines sleeping, his dog watching at his feet. Endymion, according to the Greek story, was a beautiful Shepard of Mount Latmos, and beloved by Diana (or the Moon). Poetically, he is the personification odf sleep (which was the boon he required of Jupiter) ; his greek name Endymion, signifies a being who comes gently over one; he slumbered in the cave of

The original marble, which is a late production of the artist, executed about 1820, is now in the possession of the Duke of Devonshire.


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128. NYMPH WITH A CUPID.

Group. Life size.

Sometimes called “the Nymph awakened by Love.” A beautiful female figure on a couch appears to waken up to the sounds of the lyre which cupid is playing at her feet. This statue is especially distinguished by that meretricious sentiment which was Canova’s great fault.

The original marble was executed for George IV., and is now at Buckingham Palace.


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129. PARIS.

Statue. Heroic size.

Paris, the son of Priam, King of Troy and his wife Hecuba, was exposed after his birth on Mount Ida, where for some years he lived as a Shepard. In this character he was selected by the gods to adjudge the golden apple, which was to be the prize of the fairest of the goddesses ; Juno, Minerva, and Venus, who promised him in return the possession of the most beautiful woman in the world. With her assistance, he carried off Helena, hence the siege of Troy, and the destruction of the country and family of the ravisher. Paris is here represented as the young Shepard of Mount Ida. He stands in an easy elegant attitude, holding in his hand the fatal apple of discord, and wearing the Phygian cap. The faults of Canova become merits in a subject like this, and the effeminate grace of the figure well expresses the character of Paris as exhibited in Homer.

The original marble, ordered for the Empress Josephine in 1813, was afterwards purchased by the King of Bavaria, and is now at Munich. A repetition is in the possession of the Emperor of Russia.

[1807/16 205 x 99 x 55 cm]


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130. TERPSICHORE.

The Muse who presided over dancing is here represented standing, holding in her left hand the lyre, and in the other the plectrum, the little instrument used to strike the chords. The fault of this statue is that Canova, instead of giving us the Muse who inspired “the poetry of motion,” seems to have had a dancer for his model ; it is one of the coldest and most affected of his compositions.

The original statue, which was intended for the Countess of Albany, is now the property of Count Somariva, and I believe, in his Villa on Lake Como.


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131. VENUS LEAVING THE BATH.

(Venus sortant du Bain.)

Statue Life size.

This statue is also known as “the Venus of the Pitti Palace.” She stands holding up her drapery pressed to her bosom, and the head turned to the left. A casket on the ground. This statue has been criticised, and with reason, as much more like a fine lady, too conscious of her undress, than as representing the Goddess. When the Venus de’ Medeci was carried off from Florence by the French, this statue had the honour of being placed on the empty pedestal ; but on the return of the divine occupant it was placed in the Pitti Palace, in a room panelled with mirrors.

There are repetitions of the Pitti Venus in the possession of the King of Bavaria, Lord Landsdowne, and others.


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132. [Thomas Hope] VENUS.

The attitude slightly different from the last and with less drapery. The casket is omitted. The marble is at Paris, and is one of Canova’s finest works.


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Leeds City Art Gallery

The Hope Venus is the last in a seires of figures of Venus by Canova, all inspired by the Greco-Roman Medici Venus in Florence. The sculptor's interest in this subject arose from a commission from Felix Bacciochi, King of euturia, in 1803 to make a replica of the celebrated ancient statue, which had been removed by Napoleon to Paris.

Canova was famed for his ability to render marble as flesh and his suavely erotic female figures were eagerly sought by wealthy foreigners who visited his studio in Rome. One such was Thomas Hope (1769 - 1831) architect, interior designer and passionate collector. Hope gave his Venuspride of place in a gallery of his mansion and private museum in Duchess Street, London. Removed by his heirs to his country residence, Deepdene in Surrey, it was eventually sold [1917] in London by his great grandson Lord Francis Pelham Clinton Hope. The purchaser was an eminent chemical manufacturer, Edward Allen Brotherton (later Lord Brotherton), who paid 1100 guineas for it and displayed it in the entrance hall of his residence, Roundhay Hall in Leeds. On his death it was inherited [1930] by his niece-in-law Dorothy Una Ratcliffe, a glamourous lady renowned for her volumes of Yorkshire lyrics who, in the late 1950's and early 1960's, dispersed most of her colection around local galleries and museums. Art Treasure of England. Royal Academy 1998


There was a marble copy by the Grand Fountain, this is all that is left, by the Rangers Hut in the Park.

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133. HEBE.
Statue. Life size.

The goddess of eternal youth, and the cup-bearer of the gods, is represented here with the vase in one hand, and the cup in the other, as about to pour out the nectar. No work of Canova has been more admired, nor more often repeated in every form than this figure of Hebe ; but like most of his works, it sins against pure taste, and has too much the air of a young bacchante.

The original marble was executed in 1796 for Count Albrizzi, of Venice ; a repetition, now in the possession of the Emperor of Russia, was executed for the Empress Josephine ; another slightly varied, for Lord Cawdor ; a third for the Countess Guicciardini of Florence ; a fourth for the King of Prussia ; and there are innumerable copies.


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134. PSYCHE.

Statue. Life size.

Called the Psiche Fanciulla. Psyche, who, according to the beautiful Greek myth, is the personification of the soul, and whose emblem was the butterfly ; is represented here as a lovely, innocent maiden, holding in her right hand a butterfly, which she places on the open palm of her left hand, and seems to contemplate it with a sweet thoughtfulness. This graceful statue is also a favourite work of Canova’s, and has been often repeated.

The original conception, which was first modelled in 1789, was executed in marble for Mr Blundell; the same, or a repetition, was presented by Napoleon to the Queen of Bavaria in 1807. There are innumerable copies. Canova inscribed beneath this Psyche two lines from Dante –

“Non v’accorgete voi che noi siam vermin
Nati a formar l’angelica Farfalla?”

Bethink ye not that we are only worms#
Born to produce the angel butterfly?

Which fixes his intention as to the significance of the figure.

[1793/94 150 x 50 x 60 cm]


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135. MARS AND VENUS.

Group. Heroic size.

Amongst the ancient Greeks war was represented by two divinities ; Athena or Minerva, represents thoughtfulness and wisdom in the affairs of war, and protects men and their habitations during its ravages. Ares, or Mars, on the other hand, the masculine personification, represents mere force ; he loves war for its own sake, delights in the din of battle, the slaughter of men, and the destruction of cities. This fierce and gigantic, but withal handsome god, loved, and was beloved by Aphrodite (Venus), and they are frequently represented together. In this group, Mars, wearing his helmet, and holding his lance, bids adieu to Venus, who endeavours, and as it appears, not vainly, to detain him from the field of battle. Such is the sentiment of the conception, which was intended to represent Peace and War : it will be observed that the cornucopia lies at the feet of Venus.

The original marble was commanded by George IV, as a memorial of the peace of 1816, and is now in Buckingham Palace.


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136. DANCING GIRL.

Statue. Life size.

Called in Italian “la Dansatrice ;” she appears in the act of stepping forward lightly and gaily, with her hands at her sides.

The original marble of this well-known statue was executed for the Empress Josephine, and is now in the possession of the Emperor of Russia.

(There is a third Dansatrice better than either of these, who, with the arms raised, and striking the cymbals, appears to be moving to her own music ; this statue is not so well known ; the original, or a duplicate, belongs I think to Lord Londonderry.)

All these three dancers exhibit the same merits and the same faults ; they are executed with consummate delicacy and finish, but remind us too much of ballet dancers.


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137. DANCING GIRL.

Statue. Life size.

Called “La dansatrice in riposo” – the dancer in rpose. She leans against a pedestal, with one finger on her lip, and a wreath hanging on her left arm ; the original marble was executed for Signor Domenico Manzoni of Forli. There are many repetitions and copies.

[1809-1814. 173 x 60 x 45 cm]


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138. THE MAGDALENE.

Statue. Life size.

A female figure, almost entirely undraped, in a half-kneeling, half-contemplative attitude, holds a cross in her extended hands, and appears to condsider it with profound sorrow and repentance. The original conception, one of the most admired and well-known of Canova’s works, and a favourite with himself, was first modelled in 1796. It was executed in marble in 1809, and became the property of Count Somariva ; repetitions were executed for Prince Eugene and others. The fault of this statue is the want of ideal individuality ; it represents a penitent woman ; the sinner oppressed with the sense of sin, rather than the redeemed saint ; not therefore the proper character of Mary Magdalene : but the pathetic beauty of the conception had rendered it deservedly popular.


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139. PERSEUS.

Statue. Heroic size.

Perseus, as conqueror of the Gorgon medusa, whose head he holds up in triumph. The original marble is now in the Vatican of Rome. When the Apollo Belvedere was carried off to Paris, the Perseus was placed upon its pedestal, and was beheld with unbounded enthusiasm and admiration. It is however, one of the least successful of Canova’s works, a mannered imitation of the Apollo, without character, and without individuality ; the same qualities which rendered the statues of Paris and Adonis masterpieces, are out of place in the conception of the heroic Perseus.


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140. PERSEUS.

Head of the above statue.


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http://wwwdelivery.superstock.com/WI/22 ... -27227.jpg


141. A FUNEREAL VASE.

This vase (on which is a portrait) was dedicated to the memory of an Italian countess, and is, I think, in a church at Padua. It is not in a high taste.



141*. POPE CLEMENT XIII. (CARLO REZZINICO)

(Carlo Rezzinico)

The head of the grand colossal statue in St. Peter’s at Rome. Excedingly fine, both as a portrait and a work of art. (See Portrait Gallery, No. 194.)


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141+. A SLEEPING LION.

One of the two lions on the tomb of the same Pope. The lion is justly considered one of the grandest things which Canova ever produced.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:16

GIUSEPPE DINI
1820 - 1890

Guiseppe Dini, of Novara, in Piemont.


142. THE MURDER OF THE INNOCENTS.

Colossal Group.

The stern official commanded by Herod has seized a child by the leg, and is about to tear him from his mother, who pleads distracted at the feet of the murderer. Sacred subject, picturesque, and heroic in style.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:17

GIOVANNI DUPRE
1817 - 1882

Giovanni Dupre, of Florence.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Dupr%C3%A8

143. THE DEAD BODY OF ABEL.

Statue. Larger than life.

As a representation from nature, this statue has great merit, and it is interesting as the first work of a young Florentine sculptor, whom it raised to deserved reputation. He and his wife almost deprived themselves of food in order to procure the material in which to model it ; when exhibited, it was ordered by the Grand Duke [Maximilian de Beauharnais, 3rd Duke of Leuchtenberg](about 1846).


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:18

ABBONDIO SANGIORGIO
1798 - 1879

Abbondio Sangiorgio, born at Milan, in the beginning of this century, of humble but respectable parents, studied in the Academy at Milan, where he was distinguished by his talent ans perseverance. The first work which obtaibed him celebrity was the group of “Peace in her Car, drawn by six horses,” cast in bronze, and now surmounting the Arch of Triumph, at Milan. He has since executed some admirable works, and is generally regarded as the greatest sculptor of the North of Italy.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbondio_Sangiorgio

144. CASTOR AND POLLUX.

Two Colossal Equestrian Statues.

Bronze. (From the Gates of the Royal Palace at Turin.)

These twin demigods, whose worship was so widely diffused in the antique time, were two heroic brothers, the sons of Leda and Tyndarus, who reigned over Sparta, and brothers of the too famous Helen. According to the poets they were sons of Jupiter. Their fraternal love, their prowess, and their adventures are of constant recurrence in the old Greek and Roman myths, and they figure most conspicuously in ancient art. They were the companions of Orpheus, Jason, Hercules, and other famed worthies of the Argonautic expedition, but had disappeared before the sige of troy ; and when translated to the skies, they received divine honours, and were placed among the stars as the constellation Gemini. They were styled “the mighty helpers of men.” They protected all wayfarers by land and sea.

“Back comes the chief in triumph,
Who, in the hour of fight,
Hath seen the great twin brethren
In harness on his right.
Safe comes the ship to haven,
Through billows and through gales,
If once the great twin-brethren
Sit shining in the sails.”

They were benign and propitious beings, but warlike ; tamers of horses, irresistible in might, and punishing all violations of faith and hospitality. They were especially honoured at Sparta, where they were born and reigned, and at Rome, which they saved in the Tarquinian wars. Everyone who has been at Rome will remember the colossal effigies of the “Great Twin Brethren,” on Monte Cavallo ; and every reader of Macaulay will recollect the glorious vision of the Discouri in the battle of Lake Regillus –

“So spake he, and was buckling
Tighter black Auster’s band,
When he was aware of a princely pair
That rode at his right hand.
So like they were no mortal
Might one from the owther know;
White as snow their armour was, Their steeds were as white as snow.
Never on earthly anvil
Did such rare armour gleam,
And never did such gallant steeds
Drink of an earthly stream.”

They were always represented together on the coins of Sparta, Syracuse, and Rome, and the manner of representation was nearly the same – exactly alike, mounted on celestial chargers, wearing a kind of egg-shaped cap, which is surmounted by a radiant star. The Castor and Pollux on the Monte Cavallo are, however, bare-headed. The correct classical type has been followed in these statues, which are very grand, calm, and godlike, and finely executed.


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145. THE PRODIGAL SON.

Statue. Life size.

He is seated, in an attitude of sorrow, looking up, - one of the swine at his feet. The sentiment is, “I will arise and go up to my father.” This statue was executed in marble for the late Emperor of Austria, in 1840. Sacred subject.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:19

GUISEPPE BATTISTA LOMBARDO

1823-1880

RUTH - UNCATALOGUED

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"Commissioned in 1859 by contessa Marietta Mazuchelli Longo, Lombardi's Ruth was the first of the artist's Old Testament subjects; a series which also included his Rebecca, Deborah, Susanna and Sulamite. Lombardi's reputation had been built on his sensitive and innovative memorial sculpture, which he produced with his brother Giovita, in the studio in Rome which they set up in 1852. The contessa Longo was a long-time supporter of Lombardi and indeed had previously commissioned a funerary monument to her deceased husband from the artist.

In his biblical subjects Lombardi subtly blends classicism with naturalism and reserve with allure. Ruth's eyes are modestly cast down, but her costume slips from her shoulder. Ruth, holding a sheath of wheat, is gleaning in the fields of Boaz, her future husband. The sculpture depicts the moment when Ruth is first noticed by him. The sculpture is Lombardi's best-known subject and several versions were commissioned. Despite the popularity of the piece, the sculpture did receive some criticism from the commentator in the newspaper La Sentinella Bresciana:
for placing too much emphasis on the youth and beauty of the subject. The critic wrote that the heroine, a penniless widow, should be depicted with more of an expression of suffering and sadness. Lombardi appears to have responded to the criticism when he created a second version, with more simplicity in the details and a more intense emotionalism in the face."

PIETRO MAGNI
1817 - 1877

Pietro Magni, of Milan, a pupil of Sangiorgio.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pietro_Magni_(sculptor)

146. DAVID.

Statue. Life size.

In the act of slinging the stone which slays Goliath. Very spirited and natural in attitude and expression.


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147. A GIRL SEWING.

Statue.


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148. THE FIRST STEPS, OR THE ITALIAN MOTHER.

Small Group.

A woman in the costume of a Lombard peasant, is guiding the steps of her child. These figures, and others by Rosetti, Strazza, &c., illustrate the tendency to what we call naturalism in the modern Milanese school.

[Exhibited in Great Exhibition 1851]


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CARLO MAROCHETTI

1805–1867

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlo_Marochetti

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Sir Robert peel on the left, by Marochetti.

Detested by the rest of the profession for the favour shown a FOREIGNER by the Royal Family at the time.

"Re: The statue of Lord Peel in Parliament Square.

WORK 20/31 deals with Noble's statue of Sir Robert Peel. We learn that Noble's statue was erected in 1877 and replaced that made by Baron Marochetti.

Marochetti's first statue, ready for erection in 1853 had been considered far too large and a smaller statue was executed by Marochetti to be placed at the entrance to New Palace Yard.

This however was removed in 1868 and was melted down in 1874 with a new statue being commissioned from Noble.

File WORK 20/31 opens with a letter dated 22nd March 1853 and closes in 1877 and follows these events.


http://yourarchives.nationalarchives.go ... 7,_d._1876),_sculptor
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:22

RAFFALLE MONTI

RAPHAEL [RAPHAELLE] MONTI
1818 - 1881

Raphael Monti, born at Milan, in 1818, studied under his father, Gaetano Monti, of Ravenna, also a celebrated sculptor ; and in the Imperial Academy at Milan, where he gained the first prize, the gold medal, for a group of “Alexander taming Bucephalus.” He was afterwards invited to Vienna, where he spent three years, and executed many works for the Court and nobility. In 1842 he returned to Milan, and in 1847 visited England, for the first time. He has since been much patronised in this country, and has executed several beautiful works, which were in the Great Exhibition of 1851. Monti is a sculptor of eminent talent, with that tendency to the Romantic and picturesque in style, which distinguishes the modern Milanese School of Sculpture.



149. ITALY.

Allegorical Statue. Colossal.

A grand female figure, crowned with laurel, holding in her right hand the laurel wreath of victory ; in the left the chisel, the pencil, the architects roll ; at her feet the lyre, the cornucopia teeming with fruits, and the cocoons of the silk-worm.


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"Spain" by Raffaelle Monti stands at the back of the Egyptian Court workshop. Created for the edge of the upper terrace. Image by Delamotte.




150. VERITAS. (TRUTH)

Statue. Small life size.

The statue is very cleverly conceived and delicately executed, but it is open to objections of taste. In the first place, the conception has an ambiguity which does not well express the singleness, the simplicity, and purity of abstract truth. Truth thus coquettishly unveiling herself, half-arrayed, half disarrayed, comes near to falsehood. It is vain to say that to mortals truth is never wholly – only partially revealed, dimly descried, and so forth; a statue conceived with reference to such a witty and fanciful significance, may have the merit of a concetto, but wants the higher merit of a grand and poetical idea. Secondly, the dexterity and elegance with which the effect of transparency is worked in the solid marble, might be captivating and suprising, as a novelty, but will not bear repetition, for all attempts at mere literal, illusive imitation, is beneath the dignity of sculpture. Here the imitation of transparent white muslin has the same effect to the eye as of a person of taste and feeling, that a pun would have in a passage of serious poetry; it amuses where we ought not to be amused. The imitation of transparent drapery in marble was carried to perfection, if not invented, by Antonio Corradini, a Venetian, about 1730; he devoted himself especially to this attractive but tasteless illusion. His statue of the dead redeemer in the chapel of San Severino, at Naples, is in this respect wonderful; the figure lies covered wholly by a transparent veil, through which the whole outline and features are visible and defined; but to amazing technical skill this statue adds a mystical pathos and a grace in the conception which adds to the effect of the surprise: when, however, the manner of executing this is understood, the wonder ceases. No one better than Monti (himself a most accomplished sculptor) knows the little value to be attached to this kind of excellence.


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150*. EVE

Statue. Life size.

She is seated on a flowery bank, in a disconsolate attitude, after the Fall, the head declined in sorrow and repentance – the fatal apple at her feet ; and on one side a little cherub head looking up at her with pity. Full of poetical feeling and profound sentiment, and mot admirably executed. The original marble is in the possession of H. W. Eaton, Esq.

[Henry William Eaton, Conservative M.P. for Coventry, later Lord Cheylesmore in 1887.
A London silk merchant, he took over the Coventry seat for the Conservatives after the Liberal Joseph Paxton’s death in 1865. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report ... mpid=16032]


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(By Monti are also the two fountains in the North nave, with figures of the four races of men, in a very large, noble, and poetical style, and six colossal figures on the Upper Terrace.)


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A sculptor actually employed by the Crystal Palace Company, he designed the marble urns, concrete statues round the fountains, and figures for the top of the water temples, as well as later busts produced by the Crystal Palace Art Union - a seperate company.

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:23

GIUSEPPE OBICI

GIUSEPPE OBICI
1807 - 1878

Guiseppe Obici, of Modena. He was sent by the Duke of Modena to study at Carrara, and afterwards at Rome under [Pietro] Tenerani [1787 – 1869]


152. MELANCHOLY.

Statue. Life size. Marble.

A female figure standing with her head declined, the arms hanging down, with the fingers intertwined with a languid negligence ; the drooping of the whole form is expressed with much sentiment and elegance.


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Obici's 'Melancholy' to the right.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:23

RINALDO RINALDI.
1793 - 1873

Rinaldo Rinaldi, a native of Padua ; after receiving his first education as an artist in the Academy at Venice, he received the highest prize


153. EVE.

Statue. Life size.

She stands, with head declined, lamenting her irreparable fault ; the serpent and the bitten apple lie at her feet.


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DELAMOTTE

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"18. A magnificent marble sculpture - The Temptation of Eve Italian, Circa 1862
Carrara Marble
RINALDI, Rinaldo

“THE TEMPTATION OF EVE” is a typical example of the genre of his work, as he often depicted women and occasionally explored biblical themes. The sculpture is signed to the base “R. Rinaldi Roma 1862”. It depicts Eve in the Garden of Eden captured at that crucial moment with her hand raised to her face in a remorseful manner. The serpent lurks on the tree trunk behind her while the forbidden apple has fallen, forgotten, to the ground. Rinaldo Rinaldi was the son of the Italian sculptor Domenico Rinaldi. He studied under the great master Antonio Canova of Rome during the early years of the 19th century. As a result of such influence and tutelage, his works are some of the finest examples of 19th century Italian marble figural sculpture of the mid 19th century. Rinaldi’s sculptures appear in various museums including Le Louvre in Paris and the Hermitage int. Petersburg Russia. Amongst private collections the magnificent, imposing figure of the pagan goddess Minerva, adorns the foyer of the 17th century ‘Grand Hotel de la Minerve’ in Rome. This legendary sculpture was commissioned for the hotel during the 1850s.
$125,000"
http://www.mossgreen.com.au/collection/ ... mage=33918


154. MELPOMENE.

Statue. Life size.

The muse of tragedy ; the head has the look of a portrait, and the whole treatment is conventional, and without expression in the head, or dignity in the figure.


155. HOPE.

Statue.

Leaning on her anchor, in the common-place emblematical style.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:25

ANTONIO ROSSETTI. 1819-1870

Antonio Rossetti, of Milan.


http://www.glasgowsculpture.com/pg_biog ... rossetti_a

156. ESMERALDA.

Statue. Life size.

She is seated ; her favourite attendant, the white goat, climbs to her knee ; at her side is her tambourine, and on it the cards with which she tells fortunes. The beautiful Gypsy girl is the heroine of Victor Hugo’s celebrated Romance of “Notre Dame.”


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157. GREEK SLAVE.

Statue. Life size.

A female figure partially draped, seated in a melancholy attitude with eyes cast down. The head-dress, and the coins hung around the neck, are true to the modern Greek costume ; the figure is very unaffected, elegant, and expressive of the situation. Picturesque style.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:25

GIOVANNI STRAZZA

STRAZZI STRAZZA.
1818 – 1875

[Giovanni] Strazza, of Milan. All the woks of this artist are in the picturesque style, and distinguished by a too close and literal imitation of common nature in form and expression to rank high as sculpture.


158. THE MENDICANT.

Statue. Small life size.

A kneeling beggar-girl; the sentiment very natural and too real.


[img]

159. AUDACITY.

(L’Audace.) [The Daring] Statue. Small Life size.

It is temerity, represented by a boy in the dress of a Nepolitan fisherman, in act to draw the fuse from a bomb which is about to explode ; his half crouching attitude shows that he is sensible of the danger, but reckless of it.


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Figure on right

160. ISHMAEL

Statue. Life size.

He lies extended on the earth, fainting with thirst, the empty cup in one hand. The forms are not sufficiently beautiful for sculpture. Ishmael had not been so long exposed to want that he should be thus attenuated.


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"Ismaele abbandonato nel deserto"

161. THE PERI.

Statue. Life size.

She is seated in a disconsolate attitude before the gate of Eden.

“How happy, exclaimed this child of air,
Are the holy spirits who wander there,
Mid flowers that never fade or fall
Tho’ mine are the gardens of earth and sea,
The stars themselves have flowers for me-
One blossom of heaven out blooms them all.”


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Centre Figure - DELAMOTTE
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:27

GERMAN SCULPTURE.

GUSTAF BLAESER.
1813 - 1874

Gustaf Blaeser, of Berlin. This sculptor is a pupil of Rauch, and one of his assistants in executing the models for the great monument to Frederic the Great. (See No. 195**.)


162. MINERVA PROTECTING A WARRIOR.

Group. Small life size.

For the Castle Bridge [Schlossbruke] Berlin.


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163. A CHILD CHRIST

Statue. Life size. (Designed for the Royal Christmas Tree.)

According to popular superstition in Germany and other Catholic countries, the Infant Christ descends from heaven on Christmas Eve to bring gifts to good children. This little figure is merely a picturesque fancy, and will not bear criticism of any kind.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:27

FRIEDRICH BRUGGER.
1815 – 1870?

Friedrich of Munich, studied under Scwanthaler.



164. THE CENTAUR CHIRON INSTRUCTING THE YOUNG ACHILLES.

Small Group.

The Centaur reclines on the earth, while the young Achilles, seated on his back, attempts, under his tuition, to touch the lyre. Chiron, a Centaur, half man and half horse, was celebrated for his wisdom and justice, for his knowledge of music, medicine, and archery, in which he instructed the heroes and demigods of his time – Hercules, Esulapius, Jason, and Achilles. He first taught men the use of medicinal herbs. Chiron teaching Achilles either to bend the bow or touch the lyre has always been a favourite subject in Art, as expressing EDUCATION.

Classical and elegant.


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165. PENELOPE.

Statue. Small Life size.

The wife of Ulysses hold the shuttle in her hand, in allusion to the web or shroud she had undertaken to finish before she accepted any one of her suitors ; but being resolved to defer this as long as possible, she unravelled at night the work she had done in the day; hence we compare any interminable work to “Penelope’s web.”

Classical, but somewhat cold and conventional.

Compare with No. 82.


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ILS Dublin Exhibition 1865

" In 1863 Odessa city bought Brugger’s statue “Penelope” to present to the Empress." Livadia Palace Crimea

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http://www.odessa.ua/en/news/4261/

http://livadia.russian-women.net/big/li ... 8106.shtml

http://livadia.russian-women.net/livadia_n20865.shtml

http://livadia.onetruelove.net/big/livadia_08801.shtml
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:28

HEINRICH VON DANNECKER.
1758 – 1841

Born in 1758, at Stutgardt, the capital of Wurtemburg. In those days it was the fashion to study sculpture in the ateliers of Paris, and Dannecker entered that of Pajou, which was then considered the best. Afterwards he went to Rome for a short time, and returning to his native city, passed the rest of his life in the tranquil pursuit of his art. He was of a spirit so serene and religious that Canova, who visited him in his old age, called him Il Beato – the Blessed. He was much patronised and favoured by his own sovereign; he was the first sculptor in Germany who departed from the mannerism of the 18th century, and elevated his art by a study of truth and nature. His fame rests chiefly on his two statues, the “Ariadne on the Panther,” at Frankfort, so well known from the innumerable small copies; and the statue of “Christ,” which was executed for the Empress of Russia. He died in 1841.


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166. HECTOR.

Statue. Larger than life.

The hero is represented in the act of reproaching Paris with his negligence and effeminancy.

“A spear the hero bore of wonderous strength,
Of full ten cubits was the lances length.
* * * * *
Thus entering in the glittering rooms he found
His brother-chief, whose useless arms lay round.
Him thus inactive, with an ardent look
The Prince beheld, and high resenting spoke.” [the Iliad]

This is the original model of the statue which was executed about 1795. Classical and heroic.


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167. A NYMPH.

Statue. Larger than Life.

She kneels on one knee, bending to fill her urn from the stream; the figure decorates a fountain at Stuttgardt.


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