Statues INSIDE the Crystal Palace.

The History of Sydenham from Cippenham to present day. Links to photos especially welcome!

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:29

FRIEDRICH DRAKE.
1750 - 1824

A native of Pyrmont, in the north of Germany, studied in the atelier of Rauch, in Berlin, where he has produced some admirable works. His small portrait statues (full of life and character) of Schiller, Rauch, Wilhelm and Alexander von Humboldt, &c. have become popular in Germany.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Drake


168. A GIRL BEARING FRUIT. [Winzern]

Colossal Statue.

This statue was executed to ornament the public garden at Charlottenburg, near Berlin. It has great merit in the appropriate style of the conception and treatment, - large in the forms and outline so as to strike in the open air, - picturesque and luxuriant.


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169. VASE.

Colossal. (From the Public Garden, Berlin.)

Adorned with about 22 figures in rather high relief, representing a series of festive groups engaged in rural enjoyments ; children sporting ; maidens and youths conversing ; age reposing,- full of animation and variety of character and attitude, and admirably executed, in that florid picturesque style befitting the purpose of the vase, which ornaments a public garden.


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DELAMOTTE

"Monument for King Frederick William III of Prussia in Berlin near Brandenburg Gate. 1849"

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. . . . . . and at Neusterlitz ?
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:29

GEBHARDT.

(We have no particulars of this Sculptor)

170. POMONA. [Goddess of fruits and fertility
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:31

ERNST [JULIUS] HAHNEL.

1811 - 1891

Professor in the Academy of the Fine Arts at Dresden. Studied first as an architect at Munich; was then a pupil of Schwanthaler; being called to Dresden at the time Professor Semper was building the splendid theatre there, he executed under the direction of that eminent architect some of the decorative friezes for the exterior, and four of the statues for the interior, - those of Euripides, Aristophanes, Shakespeare, and Moliere.


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171. MEDICINE.

Statue. Small life size.

An allegorical figure, enthroned, crowned with laurel, holding in her right hand the serpent feeding from the cup (which is the Greek attribute of Hygeia, or Health), and in her left a book and roll of paper.

Executed in marble, 1847.


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ART JOURNAL 1860


172. A BACCHANAL.

Alto-relievo. Life size.

Two centaurs sound their shell-trumpets, and a female centaur follows, bearing a faun on her back. These groups form part of a frieze, nearly one hundred feet in length, which decorates the north facade of the Theatre at Dresden, representing Hercules subjected by Omphale, and borne along in triumph, accompanied by the Muses, the Graces, and the Bacchanal ; (that is, Power, or Strength, subjugated and carried away by Love, Music, and Joy, a beautiful and very appropriate decoration for a theatre). Classical, and very spirited in treatment.


Semperoper, Dresden burned down in 1869
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:31

JOHANN HALBIG

JOHANN HALBIG.
1814 - 1882

Johann Halbig, of Munich ; a pupil of Schwanthaler.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Halbig

173. FRANCONIA.

Colossal Statue. ( In the Befreiungs Halle at Kelheim.)

A colossal allegorical figure, representing Franconia in German, Franken ; she is a German maiden, crowned with the oaken garland, and sustaining, with both hands, a tablet, on which is her name. Franconia is a large and important district of Bavaria, and this statue was dedicated, at the time that the canal was opened which unites the Danube with the German Ocean.


20 feet (6.5m) high

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Befreiungshalle
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:32

EDUARD SCHMIDT VON DER LAUNITZ
1797 - 1869

[Eduard] Schmidt Von Der Launitz, a native of Courland, in North Germany ; born about 1795. He studied at Rome under Thorwaldsen, and at present resides and practises his art at Frankfort. He is much distinguished in his own country, and has the rank of Baron.



174. ERATO.

Statue. Small life size.

The muse who presides over song is here tuning her lyre. Classical style.


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175. JOHAN GUTENBURG.

Monumental Group.

The memorial to the inventor of printing, who died in 1467, was erected at Frankfort ; on each side are his companions and assistants, Faust and Scheffer.


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The ethnographic busts below are by Launitz, though labeled as "from Italy" by Delamotte in 1854.

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DELAMOTTE
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:33

JOHAN ERNST MAYER.
1776 - 1844

Johann Ernst Mayer, Professor of Sculpture at Munich; born at Ludwigsburg, 1776. He had already attained a reputation in Munich, when late in life he went to Rome, and studied in the atelier of Thorwaldsen. He has since been employed at Munich, in the decoration of churches and Palaces, and has a distinguished reputation in his own country.


And now completely forgotten!

EDIT or perhaps not!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Mayer_%28sculptor%29

176. HOMER.

Statue. Life size.

He is enthroned as poet, and striking his lyre.


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177. THUCYCLIDES.

Statue. Life size.

Enthroned as historian, and holding his writings.

These fine seated figures were placed at the entrance of the Public Library at Munich in 1839.


Bavarian State Library (Bayerische Staatsbibliothek) Munich

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:34

EDUARD MULLER

1828 - 1895

http://translate.google.co.uk/translate ... rmd%3Divns

MULLER, OF BERLIN?


178. A GUARDIAN ANGEL.

Statuette.

The angel, an elegant and dignified figure, seems with outstretched arm to warn off temptation or wrong, and with the other sustains a little girl, who clings to her protector.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:34

FRANZ NEUHAUZER.
1763 – 1836?

(We have no particulars relative to this Sculptor.)

179. MERCURY AND A LITTLE SATYR.

Bas relief.

Very classical, playful and elegant.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:36

CHRISTIAN DANIEL RAUCH

CHRISTIAN RAUCH.

1777 – 1857

Chritian Rauch, of Berlin, born 1777, at Arolsen, in the Waldeck. He studied first under Professor Ruhl, of Cassel, and in 1797 repaired to Berlin, where he entered the services of Queen Louisa as chamberlain. His turn for art was, however, so decided, that he employed every leisure moment in study ; and at length in 1804, repaired to Rome, where Wilhelm von Humboldt, then Prussian minister, encouraged him by his friendship and assistance. He studied under Canova and Thorwaldsen, and in 1811 was called to Berlin to execute the monumental statue of Queen Louisa, a work of the highest beauty. He returned to Rome with a high reputation, and continued to practise his art there till the year 1822, when he fixed his atelier in Berlin, and has since resided there. No modern sculptor enjoys a higher or more universal reputation. Though Rauch has executed great works in every class of art, he is chiefly celebrated for his portrait and monumental statues ; and a list of his works would comprise the names of the greatest military and literary characters of his time and country. In his own country the statues of Blucher and Schornhorst, two heroes of the late war ; of Luther, Albert Durer, Schiller, Goethe, Schleiermacher – attest his excellence in this style of sculpture.

The last great work of this gifted and inexhaustible sculptor, is the magnificent monument to the glory of Frederick the Great. A small model of the entire monument, and cast from several of the historical bas-reliefs which adorn it, are in this collection, and will be noticed in detail in the proper place. Christian Rauch is still living. He visited England in 1850, and was received with the honours due to him.


180. A CHILD PRAYING.

Statue. Life size.

A girl about eleven years old, undraped, and standing in the antique attitude of prayer; an obvious imitation of the famous bronze of the "praying boy" at Berlin. This was an early work of the sculptor, executed when he first went to Rome (about 1809).


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Head from later version - plaster model.

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Later version in bronze.

181. A BOY HOLDING A BOOK.


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182. A BOY HOLDING A SHELL.

Two Statues. Small life size.

The figures form a pair, and appear to be intended for a school or college; the first reads from his book; the second appears about to drink from a stream - the stream of knowledge. Picturesque and elegant.


183. A DANAIDE

Statue. Life size.

A nymph, standing, holds a vase in an easy attitude, as if emptying it.

According to the Greek legend the Danaides were the fifty daughters of King Danaus, who all (except one) slew their husbands, and were punished in Hades, by being doomed to draw water everlastingly in vessels full of holes ; but there is another Greek legend, which represents four of the Danaides as the divinities of the fountainds which supplied Argos with water. This statue seems to represent a Danaide in this character, for a vessel full of holes would not need to be emptied.

The original marble was executed for the Emperor of Russia, and stands in a garden or conservatory. Classical style.


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184. A VICTORY.

Statue Life size.

Crowned with laurel, and holding a branch of laurel.


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185. A VICTORY.

Statue Life size.

Crowned with olive, and holding the olive-bough.


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186. A VICTORY.

Statue Life size.

Crowned with oak, and holding the bough of oak. (The oak is the symbol of Germany).


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187. A VICTORY.

Statue Life size.

Lifting the laurel from her own brow, as if in the act to bestow it on victor.


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188. A VICTORY.

Statue Life size.

Holding the palm branch, and stepping forward.

These five noble and poetical figures were executed by Rauch for the VALHALLA, or "Temple of Fame," near Ratisbon.[Regensburg?]


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189. A VICTORY.

Statue Life size.

Seated on a throne, and in the act to distribute crowns of laurel.


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[Copy at Osborne House]
[1851 Dover p 236]

189.* PUBLIC HAPPINESS

A female figure standing, and bearing a cornucopia. Classical, and rather conventional in style.


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190. THE MAIDEN OF THE STAG.

Statuette

(styled in German "Die jungfrau Lorenz von der Tangermunde.")


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191. AN EAGLE.

Statue. Life size.

When Rauch was at Carrara, modelling his statue of Queen Louisa, a magnificent eagle was brought to him in a wounded state; he modelled it from nature, and placed it at the feet of the queen as she lies on her bier. It is perhaps the finest thing of the kind ever executed.


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192. FOUR LONG BAS-RELIEFS.

Representing the march from Berlin to Paris, in 1815. From the tomb of Marshal von Bulow. The figures represent groups of soldiers in the Prussian uniform - marching, or at rest; feasting, drinking, bivouacking, &c. - very much crowded, and in the picturesque historical style.


193. AN EAGLE.

Statue. Life size.

Also from the monument erected to Field-Marshall [Friedrich Wilhelm Freiherr] von Bulow.


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193* TWO STAGS.

Recumbent.

From the entrance to the public gardens at Berlin. [Wildpark at Potsdam.]


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Negretti and Zambra stereoview - caption reads "A stag Resting, from the entrance to the Public Gardens, at Berlin also Statue of a Danaide by Christian Rauch of Berlin. Both of these are in front of the Stationers Court."

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193** TWO YOUTHS, OR STUDENTS.

Bas-relief.

From the monument of Field-Marshall von Schornhorst.


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grabmal von Johann David von Scharnhorst

194. SMALL MODEL OF THE MEMORIAL ERECTED TO FREDERIC THE GREAT.

195. EQUESTRIAN STATUE OF FREDERIC THE GREAT, KING OF PRUSSIA.

The original life size model for the colossal bronze statue.

195.* THE CARDINAL VIRTUES.

Four seated statues.

Placed at the angles of the pedestal:

A. PRUDENCE, with her mirror;
B. TEMPERANCE, with the curb;
C. Justice, with her sword;
D. FORTITUDE or COURAGE, with her club.

195.** THE HISTORY OF FREDERIC THE GREAT.

A series of Eight subjects in bas-relief, round the monument.

All these form part of the great monument lately erected in a fine situation in Berlin, the space surrounded by the Royal Palaces, Arsenal, Museum, Theatres, and principal public walk, and visible from them all. Any remarks on the life and character of Frederic the Great would be out of place here, and belong to another department, that of the Gallery of Portraits (see No. 376). In reference to the splendid memorial we are now to consider, the observer must remember that it was this Monarch who won for Prussia that high political and military position which, since his reign, but not before, she has held in Europe, and that this magnificent and costly monument may be regarded as well deserved; as an expression of gratitude from the nation which, not withstanding his long and terrible wars, he left powerful, aggrandised, and enriched; under this point of view it is an appropriate ornament of the capital of Prussia.

The monument had long been projected by the late King, Frederic William III., and in 1830 the design was entrusted to Professor Schinkel, the architect, and Professor Rauch, the sculptor; the model for the whole was finished in 1839. the colossal model for the figure of the King on horseback, was executed in 1842, and was successfully cast in bronze in 1846. By the end of the year 1850, the bas-reliefs and insulated statues grouped round the base were finished; and in May, 1851, the monument was completed, and inaugurated with military pomp and festive rejoicings, and much national exultation.

It will be seen, on reference to the small model, that the pedestal is formed of three compartments, rising one above another. The basement is composed of mighty blocks of granite. On this is raised a pedestal of bronze, round which are grouped the statues of those men who were distinguished in the diplomatic, military, and civil service; they are twenty-four in number, of which the four at the corners are equestrian. The groups on each side comprise the military chiefs; those at each end, the ministers, judicial functionaries, and literary men. All these statues are cast in bronze, and are careful portraits of the personages represented. Above this rises another pedestal; at the four corners are the four seated Cardinal virtues (above described). The sides, and two ends, are occupied by a series of bas-reliefs, which illustrate the history of the King. He himself appears on the summit of all, mounted on his charger, and every detail of his person and dress accurately copied from life. Nothing is idealised, but the whole is so arranged as to produce a most admirable and imposing effect. The model of the equestrian statue of the King, which though as large as life, is much smaller than the bronze, as well as the four seated Virtues, which are somewhat conventional in treatment and application, having been noticed, it only remains to describe and explain the series of eight bas-reliefs illustrating the life and character of the King:-

E. Represents the birth of Frederic, who is represented by a good genius to his parents.

F. The Muse of History instructs him, and rouses his ambition by unfolding the names and the deeds of the heroes of old.

G. He receives his first arms from Pallas.

H. He is examining the web of a weaver of Silesia (famous for its linens). This subject expresses his encouragement of manufactures.

I. In the next he is leisurely playing the flute. Frederic not only patronised music, but was himself an excellent performer on the flute.

K. He is seated in his cabinet at San-Souci: an attendant places before him the celebrated bronze statue of the “Praying Boy,” for which he paid a sum amounting to 5,000l., and which is now a principal ornament of the Museum at Berlin. (See No. in Greek Court) The subject expresses his patronage of the fine arts; the greyhounds at his feet are also characteristic.

L. The bas-relief at the south end represents the King seated on the column at Kulmbach, and meditating on the vicissitudes of war.

M. That on the east represents his apotheosis, where, seated between the wings of an eagle, he is borne into the regions of immortality.

The treatment of some of these subjects is open to criticism; for instance, the incongruous mingling of the purely ideal with the most matter-of-fact reality; as where the Muse, Clio, draped a l’antique, is instructing the little prince, in coat and waistcoat; and Pallas Athene presents a sword to a young soldier in a cocked hat and gaiters; all this is in very questionable taste. But the monument, taken altogether, is very grand; and the difficulties overcome have been immense.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:37

ERNST-FREDERIC-AUGUSTUS RIETSCHEL.

ERNST-FREDERIC-AUGUSTUS RIETSCHEL.

1804 - 1861

Born at Pulsnitz, a little town in Saxony, in 1804. He studied drawing in the Academy at Dresden, and at the age of twenty entered the atelier of Rauch, at Berlin, who soon discovered and appreciated his uncommon talent. In his twenty-fourth year he gained the Great prize, and was sent to rome where he studied about a year. In 1832, he was appointed Professor of sculpture in the Academy at Dresden. Rietschel has a great reputation; his principal works are at Dresden and Munich.


196. A “PIETA.”

Group. Life size.

The “Pieta” is the title, in Italian art, given to a group which represents the dead Saviour after he has been taken down from the cross, mourned by his mother the Virgin Mary, or by angels. In this conception of the subject, Christ is extended on the earth, in front; while his mother, kneeling, bends over him, mournful, yet resigned.


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197. CUPIDS RIDING ON A PANTHER.

Two bas-reliefs.

A. in the first, Cupid is carried of by the Panther


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B. In the second, he has subdued the animal nature, and rides him in triumph. Both very significant and graceful compositions. Classical style.


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198. THE CHRIST-ANGEL.

(Christ-engel.) Bas-relief.

This beautiful composition expresses the belief popular in Germany and other countries, that on Christmas-eve the infant Christ descends from Heaven, accompanied by angels, to bless pious little children, and bring them presents.


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199. MORNING, NOON NIGHT, DAWN.

Four bas-reliefs.

A. The DAWN, a Genius with eyelids half unclosed, holds a torch reversed, the bat under his feet.

B. MORNING, a Genius holding his torch on high, has the owl beneath his feet, the lark rising at his side.

C. NOON, holds a garland of flowers, chasing a butterfly.

D. NIGHT, a Genius holding in one hand the sleep-bestowing poppies, while with the other he draws the mantle of concealment over his head.


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200. LESSING.

Colossal Statue.

Cast in bronze, and erected in 1851, to the honour of the great German author in his native city of Brunswick. He is represented in the dress of his time. Portrait statue in the picturesque style, most remarkable for the noble and easy grace with which the difficult costume is managed. (For an account of Lessing, see Portrait Gallery, No. 335).


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:38

SCHLOTTAUR, OF MUNICH.

201. A MADONNA.

Statue. Life size.

She is standing in an attitude of devotion, crowned as Queen of Heaven; and trampling on the serpent, the emblem of sin.


Joseph Schlotthauer ?
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:38

CARL JOHANN STEINHAUSER.

1813 - 1879

Carl Johann Steinhauser born in 1813 in Bremen, studied at the School of Drawing, on completing his studies there he left to work with Rauch in Berlin. He lived in Rome from 1835 to 1863 when he left to become a Professor at the School of Art in Carlsruhe, remaining there until his death in 1879. His works include a statue of Psyche and one of Pandora in the Museum at Bremen, and a bust of Sapho in the Museum of Art in Carlsruhe.

201.* A VIOLIN PLAYER.

Statue. Small life size.

[Copies in Kuntshalle Bremen, and Peabody Collection, Maryland.]


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:40

LUDWIG [LOUIS] SCHWANTHALER.

1802 - 1848

Belongs to a family who have followed the profession of sculpture in stone or wood for nearly 200 years; his father, his two uncles, and a cousin, have all been sculptors; but whatever reputation these may have merited, has been merged in the brilliant and extended fame of the great artist whose works here we have to review. He was born at Munich, the capital of Bavaria, in 1802. His life was unmarked by vicissitudes of any kind. Educated in his father’s studio he had not to struggle with difficulties; the very atmosphere he breathed from infancy was in harmony with his genius; he received an excellent literary and classical training, and was an accomplished scholar as well as an accomplished artist. He was twice at Rome, in 1825 and 1832-3, but spent not more than three years altogether in that city. He fixed his residence at Munich, where he became Professor of Sculpture in the Academy, and assembled round him a vast number of scholars and assistants, who executed wholly or in part the creations which teemed from his versatile and inexhaustible genius. He drew and modelled with wonderful rapidity and correctness, but with a perfect understanding of the spirit and capabilities of his art; his facility has never betrayed him into the common-place. In every style he displayed the same richness of invention, and the same inexhaustible variety; his bas-reliefs from the Greek mythology and the Greek dramatists are in the purest classical taste; his religious and historical monuments are equally admirable. He treated the old mediaeval church legends, - as the story of St. George and the Dragon, - St. Dorothea, &c., - not with the gothic formality, but a peculiarly poetical spirit; and the style which we may call the romantic and chivalrous, he brought within the true limits of sculpture. Every subject he touched he animated with that peculiar life which belonged to it, in this respect his compositions from the comedies of Aristophanes are considered as fine as his saints, his angels, and his old German legends. His fault was careless execution; in fact, he seldom finished or worked out his own conceptions, but left this to his pupils and workmen. Among his last works was the gigantic statue, representing under the semblance of a noble female figure, his native country, Bavaria; but he did not live to see her placed on her pedestal, amid the acclimations of his countryman. His health had never been robust, and he died, absolutely exhausted by the activity of his genius, in the year 1848, in his forty-seventh year.


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202. A NYMPH. [Melusine]

Statue. Life size.

She is standing, leaning with one hand on a trunk of a tree, entwined with ivy. Though called a nymph, this statue suggests the idea of a listening Eve.


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Copy at Russell Coates Museum.

203. A NYMPH.

Statue. Larger than Life.

The Nymph of the Danube, seated on a rock; the waves and a fish at her feet; she holds the Lyre, because the banks of the Danube were famous for poets and musicians. This fine statue, noble in conception and treatment, was executed for the Hofgarten at Munich.


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204. CERES AND PROSERPINE.

Group. Smaller than life.

Proserpine kneeling on one knee presents a flower to Ceres, who stands upon her serpent-drawn car; though a classical subject, grouped rather in the picturesque style. Executed in marble, in 1843, for Count von Redern, of Berlin.


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205. BAVARIA.

Colossal Head. Cast from the statue at Munich.

This staute is considered to be the grandest work, as combining size with beauty, which has been executed in modern times. The Ex-King Louis of Bavaria erected, on an eminence outside the western gates of Munich, an edifice in white marble, intended as a Temple of Fame, or Hall of Heroes (in German “Ruhmeshalle”) to receive the busts and statues of celebrated Bavarians. In front of this temple stands a stupendous figure, executed about 1838, was colossal, thirteen feet high; but this was afterwards enlarged to the not only colossal but gigantic statue which now stands there. Bavaria is represented as a German maiden, crowned with the oaken garland, from beneath which her long luxuriant tresses float in masses to her shoulders; the right arm is raised, and in her hand she holds the laurel crown which rewards desert; the left hand pressed on the mighty bosom holds a sword to defend her independence: she reminds us of the description of the Titan goddess in Hyperion :-

“Her face was large as that of Memphian sphinx.
By her in statue the tall Amazon
Had stood a pigmy’s height: she would have ta’en
Achilles by the hair and bent his neck,
Or with a finger stayed Ixion’s wheel.”

The height of the figure is 54 feet, that of the seated lion watching at her side 27 feet, and the pedestal is 30 feet high, so that the height of the whole is 114 feet. The casting in bronze of this enormous figure was a process of great difficulty and expense. It was begun in 1844, and completed in Various portions in 1848. The statue was placed on its pedestal and unveiled to the people, October 9, 1850, in the midst of fetes and rejoicings, which were shadowed by regrets, for Scwanthaler and Stiegelmayer (the latter the greatest worker in bronze in Europe), had both died during the progress of the work.


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206. FIGURE OF VICTORY.

207. A FIGURE OF VICTORY.

Each holding her palm branch, and leaning on a circular shield which stands between them.


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From the Befreiungshalle [1842 -63] in Bavaria.

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208. ANGEL


209. ANGEL.


210. ANGEL.


211. ANGEL.

Small statues.

These figures are not particularly remarkable; they are executed in marble for the private chapel in the chateau of Prince Matternich.


212. A KNIGHT.

Statuette.

In complete armour, leaning on a broad sword, and holding a cup in his gauntleted hand. This was an early work, remarkable as being the first attempt in that revival of the gothic or chivalric style which has since become popular, and in which Schwanthaler excelled. Picturesque.


213. BELLEPHRON WITH PEGASUS AND PALLAS.

Circular Bas-relief.

Bellephron, when proceeding on his expedition against the Chimera, is assisted by Pallas in subduing the winged horse Pegasus, who is to bear him through the air.


214. THESEUS AND HIPPOLYTA.

Circular Bas-relief.

Theseus, King of Athens encounters in battle, Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons, whom he overcame and afterwards married. The two subjects forma pair, strictly classical in treatment.


215. THE SHIELD OF HERCULES.

Circular Bas-relief.

The subjects represented in relief, according to the description in Hesiod: “in the centre is a monstrous serpent, and around it every sort of terrible force and power. The ocean with swans swimming on, and fishes playing in, the waves, occupy the outer rim. In the intermediate circle, there is, first, a fight of lions and boars; then the battle of the Centaurs and Lapithae, with Mars in his chariot and Pallas in arms. Next is seen Apollo playing on the lyre, in an assembly of the gods; then an arm of the sea, dolphins pursuing the other fishes, and a fisherman about to throw a casting net. After this Perseus appears, flying in the air, a detached figure on the surface of the shield, with Medusa’s head at his back; the other Gorgons follow, wreathed about with serpents. Then is seen a besieged city, with a battle, and the Fates, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos ranging over the field, and contending for the dead. Achlys, the dimness or shadow of death or misery, stands near, a hideous figure. Then follow successive representations of a city at peace, and full of pomps and festivals of reaping, of sheaf binding, of vintaging, of boxing, of hare-hunting, and lastly, of the chariot-race.”

Compare with No. “65.

We ought to have here a cast from Flaxman’s shield of Achilles, as described in Homer, to contrast with both. From the very exact descriptions of these shields, it has been assumed that the art of working in metal, and chiselling or beating out figures in relief, must have been carried to great perfection at a very early period.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:43

BERTEL THORWALDSEN.
1770 - 1844

Albert, or, as he was called in his own country, BERTEL THORWALDSEN, was born at Copenhagen in 1770. His family was noble: he counted, as we are assured, ancient kings of Denmark and famous Icelandic poets and sages among his remote ancestry; but his parents were so reduced in station and in fortune, that his father (whose trade it was to carve figure-heads for ships) could with difficulty provide for the education of his son. Albert was a quiet, reserved, dreamy, silent boy, supposed to be dull, known to be ignorant, but he was a born artist; and in his father’s workshop he learned at least to use his tools. He was at length sent to the drawing school of the Academy, which he attended for several years, during which he assisted his father, and struggled with poverty and hardship; in 1795 he gained the highest academic prize for a model in bas-relief, which gave him the privilege of being sent to Rome, at the expense of the Academy, with a salary of 300 dollars for three years. He was still, while poetry and art were fermenting within his soul, so ignorant of the commonest elements of literature, that it was necessary to detain him for two years before he could set off. He arrived at Rome in the year 1767, and there he passed a year or more, doing nothing, lost apparently in idle contemplation of the wonders around him, to the great discouragement and almost despair of his friends. In the year 1799 his small pension expired; he was now in his thirtieth year but he had done so little, and the case appeared so hopeless, that he was on the point of returning to Denmark. At this critical moment, a rich Englishman, the well-known Thomas Hope, entered his studio and found there the model of the statue of Jason. He was struck by it, ordered it in marble, and generously laid down more than the price asked for it; Thorwaldsen remained in Rome to study, to work, to reach a height of fame and success which he had, perhaps, silently dreamed of himself, but which no one had anticipated for him; when, thirty-eight years afterwards he revisited his native city of Copenhagen, he was “received among men like a descended god.” He had left Copenhagen an obscure melancholy boy, he returned rich. A frigate was sent to convey him to his native shore, and when he landed, the people drew his carriage in triumph to the city. In 1841, he revisited Rome, collected his property together, and finally returned to Copenhagen in 1842. His long, happy, glorious life was crowned by a death as happy. On taking his accustomed seat each one evening to listen to a musical performance, his head after a while sank on his breast, and he never raised it again. Thus he died at the age of seventy-three. Those who have once seen Thorwaldsen, will not easily forget the handsome old man, with his regular features, his ample brow, his penetrating blue eye, and flowing white hair. Of his merit as an artist there can be but one opinion: his superiority to Canova is now generally admitted. His inventive genius was a s various as it was inexhaustible; and the ease, precision, and facility with which the clay took form under his hands, was often a matter of astonishment to those who stood by: when some observed that he could not chisel the marble with the same certainty that he modelled the clay, he replied laughingly, that if his hands were tied behind him he would bite a statue out of the marble with his teeth. Of his almost innumerable works all are not of course equally good, but no man has left behind so many that may be pronounced excellent. In the management of bas-relief he attained perfection. He was the first among the moderns who felt and applied the principles on which the Greek artists worked in this style, and who understood the widely different laws which regulate the picturesque and the sculptural treatment. In the latter part of his life he devoted himself principally to religious subjects. A few only of his most celebrated productions are here, but sufficient to exhibit the astonishing versatility of his powers. Among his statues, the Shepherd Boy, the Seated Mercury, the Venus with the Apple, have not been surpassed. Of his bas-reliefs the grand frieze of the Triumph of Alexander is perhaps his finest. In these classical compositions he sometimes gave a new and charming significance to the old forms and associations, which entitle him to rank as a born poet. His fancy was always regulated by a pure taste and an elevated moral sentiment. Thorwaldsen executed many busts and portrait statues, but on the whole was not so happy in them as his ideal works. His statue of Lord Byron, for instance, must be pronounced a failure both in the resemblance of the head and in a characteristic treatment; it is a mistake altogether. Nor are his statues of Goethe and Schiller quite satisfactory. The works of Thorwaldsen are scattered all over Europe. Some of his finest are in England, and he never forgot that his first patron had been an Englishman. He died in 1843.


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216. HOPE.

Statue. Life size.

This fine statue is a singular conception of the subject, an imitation of the grave Etruscan style. Hope stands before us here pensive rather than joyous; a maiden dignified and modest, with rich and ample drapery, which she raises with her left hand, in act to step forward; while in her right she holds the yet unopened lotus flower.

The model was completed in 1818, and executed in marble for the Baroness von Humboldt (the wife of Wilhelm), in 1829. When she died, a copy, by Tieck, of this statue was by her own desire placed at the head of her grave. It was while occupied with the restoration of the Elgin marbles that Thorwaldsen modelled this statue, and it shows how deeply his imagination had been impressed by the serious and formal style of those remains of early Greek art.

Classical – somewhat archaic in style. (See Greek Court page 20.)


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217. VENUS.

Statue. Life size.

Standing, she holds in her right hand the fatal apple decreed to her by Paris; the left rests on her drapery, thrown over the trunk of a tree; she seems to turn to the other goddesses with triumph. This is a very exquisite version of the “Venus Victrix” of the ancients. The first conception was considerably under the size of life. The artist, however, broke the model, and repeated his design of a larger size, in 1816. It was executed in marble, for Lord Lucan, about the year 1824.


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218. VENUS WITH THE APPLE.

Statue. Life size.

This is the same subject as No.217, and the same treatment; but the model has been slightly altered; the leg is less bent, and the turn of the head not quite the same. The alterations however are so trifling, that though they are felt at the first view, it requires a close and careful comparison to appreciate them.


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219. MERCURY.

Statue. Life size.

Mercury seated, holds in his left hand the pipe with which he has soothed Argus to sleep; in his right hand he grasps the sword with which to slay him. According to the Greek legend, Argus, with his hundred watchful eyes, was sent by Hera (Juno) to guard Io; Jupiter commissioned his messenger, Mercury, to carry off Io, which he accomplished by putting Argus to sleep with the sound of his pipe, and then cutting off his head. This statue is one of the most perfect productions of modern art which excel it, in the completeness and beauty with which the conception has been carried out. In the action and attitude, the present, the past, and the future moments are exquisitely blended; the god has just taken the reed pipe from his lips, the sounds still float in the air, his head is turned towards the sleeper with a look of suspense, the word is half unsheathed; but the moment, though one of transition, is one of repose; and nothing can exceed the quiet grace of the attitude, and the youthful, god-like beauty of the form. This statue was modelled in 1818. The first marble was executed for the Prince of Augustenburg; the second (a most perfect example) is in the possession of Lord Ashburton, and there are other repetitions.


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220. GANYMEDE.

Statue. Small life size.

The youthful cup-bearer of the gods holds the cup in the left hand, the vase raised in his right and in the act of pouring out nectar for the gods. He wears the Phrygian cap or bonnet, which, in Greek art, is the usual attribute of the inhabitants of Asia Minor. According to the Greek myth Ganymede was carried off by the Eagle of Jove while keeping his flocks on the plains of Troy.

Classical, and exquisite for true antique feeling and grace.


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221. A SHEPHERD.

He is seated in an easy attitude of repose, on a fragment of rock, over which is thrown a sheepskin; the right hand is round his leg; with the other he leans on his staff; his dog is at his side. The model for this most beautiful work was a young Shepard of the Campagna. The dog is the portrait of the artist’s favourite dog Teverino.

The original marble was executed about 1817, for Thorwaldsen’s friend Mr. Krause, of Weintrop, near Dresden. A repetition is in the possession of Lord Cowley.

Classical style.


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222. THE THREE GRACES.

Aglaia, the eldest of the Graces, half embraces her sisters. Thalia holds the golden arrow of Love, and Euphroyne seems about to feel the point of it. As the three stand, their arms are intertwined with a peculiarly modest and easy grace, and the harmony which unites them is expressed by the little Genius of Love who tunes his lyre at their feet. In this group, Thorwaldsen successfully competed with the well known composition of Canova, then universally celebrated, and as it was thought, not to be surpassed in art. The observer will do well to compare them, as has been done in a famous epigram by the King of Bavaria, who gives the merited palm to the more chaste and throroughly Greek conception of Thorwaldsen. The Graces here are the beautiful beneficent Charites. (See No. 125). The model for this group was completed in 1817, and first executed in marble for the Prince of Augustenburg in 1819.


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223. LOVE BENDING HIS BOW.

Statue. Small life size.

This is not the divine Eros of the Greeks, but the playful, mischievous Cupid of the Latins, treated in the picturesque style:-

“Qui que tu sois, voici ton maitre;
Il l’est, le fut, ou le doit etre!”

Compare this conception of the deity of love with that of Gibson, N0. 23.


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224. A GENIUS SEATED AND PLAYING THE LYRE.

This figure was originally placed at the feet of the three Graces, and has since been often repeated by the artist as a separate statue, being in sentiment very beautiful, and complete in itself.


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225. A VASE.

With bas-reliefs.

Representing what has been called “the Life of Love” (La linea della vita umana). The subject of this Bas-relief was suggested by a graceful antique picture found in the ruined city of Herculaneum, representing a girl selling Cupids. Thorwaldsen has extended and varied this idea into a very beautiful and significant composition. The maiden is here a winged Psyche; she has a cage near her, full of little Cupids, some of which are peeping through the bars of the cage, others trying to escape: a child behind Psyche lifts up the covering of the cage, and peeps to see what is there; while another, a little older, appears half inclined to play with them, though with a suspicion they are not quite so harmless as they seem. Before Psyche kneels a girl, receiving into her open arms the little Cupid which is presented to her: another maiden carries off her purchase, fondly pressed to her bosom: another, who seems already to repent her bargain, holds him by the wings with thoughtful downcast eyes. The next figure is that of a man in the prime of life, seated, while the little god rides triumphant on his shoulders. The last figure is that of an old man, from whom Cupid has escaped, and is flying off with a mocking air, while the other is stretching forth his hand in vain.

This elegant bas-relief was executed in marble, about the year 1825, and is in the possession of Mr. Labouchere. [Pierre Cesar Labouchere]


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The Ages of Love.

226. THE TRIUMPH OF ALEXANDER.

Frieze, in Bas-relief. Almost eighty feet long, by one foot ten inches high.

To under all the beauty and interest of this magnificent composition, it is necessary to say a few words of its history. In the year 1812, Napoleon entertained the project of visiting Rome, and ordered that the Pope's Palace [Quirnal Palace], on Monte Cavallo, should be prepared for his reception, and furnished and decorated as an imperial residence. One of the halls of reception was to be ornamented by a frieze running round the upper part of the wall, and the commision was given to Thorwaldsen, who had only three months to complete his work. As a significant compliment to Napoleon, he chose for his subject "The Triumphal Entrance of Alexander the Great into Babylon." The whole composition, though forming altogether an harmonius and connected deries, may be divided into two parts, meeting in the centre. The procession on the right represents Alexander and his Greeks approaching the gates of Babylon. The procession on the left represents the inhabitants of the conquered city going forth to meet them.

A. First appears Alexander, on his triumphant car, drawn by four horses. Victory at his side, holds the reins.

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B. The car is followed by a two armour-bearers, carrying the shield, bow, and lance, of the hero. Then Alexander's famous horse, Bucephalus, prancing and rearing, and attended by two grooms, who are endeavouring to rein him in.

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C. Three of Alexander's favourite generals, Antipater, Perdiccas, and antigenus, on horseback.

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D. Then Leonnatus, who commanded the cavalry, and was one of Alexander's most distinguished friends; he is followed by a troop of horsemen.

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E. The infantry, represented by a group of soldiers on foot.

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F. An elephant next appears, loaded with the spoils of the enemy; near him walks a captive prince, who has been supposed to represent the Prince of Gaza, but rather, I imagine, expresses, in an abstract way, the subjugation of the Princes of the east. a troop of guards close the procession. The shield of last figure bears (in the original marble) the head of Thorwaldsen.

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Returning to the centre. The first figure on the left is the Genius of Peace, who approaches to meet and welcome the conqueror. The Governor of Babylon and his five children follow as supplicants.

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G. Next appear three graceful female figures of women, strewing flowers, and a child with a basket on his head.

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H. Then Bagophanes, the treasurer of Darius, and distinguished by his servility to the conqueror, appears with four attendants, about to erect an altar, and burn incense.

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I. Next follows a procession of supplicants, bearing gifts; three superb courser; lions and panthers chained, with their keepers, &c.

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J. ?

K. The Chaldean Magi and Priests close this part of the procession. They had foretold that Alexander's entry into Babylon would be the cause of his destruction.

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The third part of the frieze, filling up the lower end of this room, represents the walls of the city, and the open space near it, and the river Euphrates, with spectators, who have assembled to see the show; people are looking down from the ramparts: below is seen a shepherd with his family; on the river is a boat with three men; a fisherman is seated on the bank; a camel, with a family of peasants, and a few palm trees, express the Oriental locality.

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In contemplating this frieze, which is one of the most celebrated works of the sculptor, in a department of his art in which he excelled, that of bas-relief, we are struck by tow things;- first, the exceeding beauty of the composition, in which, without and crowding or confusion, or unnecessary figures, all the circumstances and sentiments of the scene are expressed with the most vivid truth, yet with the ideal treatment proper to sculpture. Secondly, we cannot but feel that the choice of the subject had a fitness which the artist did not contemplate. Alexander entered Babylon to meet his death; this was his last triumph. Napoleon, in whose honour the work was executed, was then setting out on his Russian expedition, which resulted in his downfall; he had seen the last of his triumphs. It is curious, also, that, notwithstanding the totally different style of treatment, we are struck by a resemblance to the processions in the newly discovered Nineveh sculptures, where we see a conquering despot, riding in his chariot, attended by the Genius of Victory, while slaves and captives, and spoils, and strange animals, with their keepers, figure conspicuously. the first cast of this frieze in plaster still decorates the Pope's Palace on Monte Cavallo, though now unfitted for the loclity. It has twice been executed in marble, once for the Palace of the King of Denmark, at Copenhagen (in 1829); and again for Count Somavaria, for which he paid 100,000 francs. [villa Carlotta]





227. NAPOLEON.

Colossal Bust.

As Victor, crowned with laurel. The eagle wings in front, the palm behind, and the cannon ball, are all in questionable taste.


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228. LORD BYRON.

Bust.

Feeble, almost ignoble, and without likeness or character.

Of these two busts I must remark, that neither Napoleon nor Lord Byron ever sat to Thorwaldsen. (See Portrait Gallery, Nos. 311 and 418.)


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229. MINERVA ADJUDGES THE ARMOUR OF ACHILLES TO ULYSSES.

Bas-relief. Six figures.

After the death of Achilles in the Trojan War, Ulysses and Ajax contended for the honour of inheriting his arms; by the advice of athena (Minerva), they were adjudged by Agamemnon, not to Ajax, the strong man, but to Ulysses, the wise man, in which it must be owned Athena showed some partiality to her favourite; in consequence of this decision, Ajax was seized with madness and slew himself. The subject is taken from Sophocles. Classical style.


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230. APOLLO PLAYING TO THE GRACES AND THE MUSES.

Bas-relief. Thirteen figures.

Apollo (he is here in his character of Musagetes) is seated on the left, playing on his lyre; the three Graces, standing on an eminence mutually embracing, appear to listen. In front of apollo, Euterpe, the Muse of lyric poetry, plays on the double pipe. Terpsichore, the Muse of dance and song, sounds the tambourine; and Erato, the Muse who inspired love songs, crowned with flowers, appears behind. The other Muses, Calliope, Clio, Melpomene, Polyhymnia, Urania, Thalia, join in the dance. (To dance at the festivals of the gods was one of the occupations of the Muses; and according to Pindar, the Graces were enthroned on Olympus, next to Apollo.)

Classical style.


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231. THE FOUR SEASONS.

Four circular Bas-reliefs.

A. SPRING, a female figure, attended by two genii bearing baskets of flowers.

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B. SUMMER, a harvest scene, with a group of reapers.

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C. AUTUMN, a hunter returns to his home bearing game; a woman and a child (seated under a vine loaded with grapes) receive him.

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D. WINTER, an old man warming his hands over a brazier, while an old woman lights her lamp.

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232. THE GENIUS OF THE NEW YEAR.

Circular Bas-relief.

A winged figure expressing the attributes of the four seasons; he has skates to his feet, and bears a bunch of grapes, a sickle and ears of wheat, and a wreath of flowers; around him, in a circle, the twelve signs of the zodiac.

Classical- somewhat picturesque treatment.


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233. CUPID AND HYMEN.

Bas-relief.

Love holds the distaff; Hymen spins the thread.


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234. CUPID AND GANYMEDE.

Bas-relief.

Ganymede seated, Cupid standing; they are playing at an ancient game of chance.


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235. CUPID AND PSYCHE.

Bas-relief.

Flying or floating through the air.


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236. CUPID AND HYMEN.

Bas-relief.

Both winged, borne through the air; Hymen lights his torch; Cupid bends his bow.


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237. CUPID BOUND BY THE GRACES.

Bas-relief.

The three Graces, seated, bind Cupid with garlands of flowers, having first stolen his arms. A very charming and significant allegory; classical treatment.


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238. THE BIRTH OF BACCHUS.

Bas-relief.


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239. LOVE CARESSING A DOG.

Bas-relief.

The dog here is a symbol of fidelity.


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240. LOVE MAKING HIS NETS.

Bas-relief.


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241. JUPITER DICTATING LAWS TO LOVE.

Bas-relief.

Jupiter is enthroned, and Cupid, with a tablet in his hand, stands before him, and appears to be writing from his dictation. These three form a series.

The conception is poetic calm the treatment classical.


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242. THE FOUR ELEMENTS.

Bas-relief.

A. AIR bestrides the Eagle, and is armed with the thunder.

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B. EARTH guides the lion.

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C. WATER, bearing the trident of Neptune, is borne by a dolphin.

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D. FIRE, having yoked Cerebrus (who guarded the flaming gates of Tartarus), drives him with the fork of Pluto.

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Elegant and classical, yet somewhat conventional in treatment.


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243. BACCHUS FEEDING LOVE.

Bas-relief.

Bacchus, vine-crowned, and with his attributes (the leopard at his side, and the thyrsus, the staff surmounted by the fir-cone, which lies near him) holds out a cup of wine to the God of Love, who takes it in both hands, with a sort of child-like innocence and unsuspiciousness. Classical and very elegant.


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244. LOVE AWAKENING PSYCHE.

Bas-relief.

She has swooned, after opening the casket entrusted to her by Proserpine. Love takes an arrow from his quiver, with which to recall her to life.


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245. THE BAPTISM OF CHRIST.

Bas-relief.

Two figures only; the Redeemer stands of the water, with hands meekly folded on his breast. St. John holds the shell.


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246. A GUARDIAN ANGEL.

Bas-relief.

The angel directing and protecting the steps of a child.


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247. THREE SINGING ANGELS.

Bas-relief.

Gracefully grouped, and singing from the same music-scroll.


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248. THREE PLAYING ANGELS.

One has a lute, the other a harp, the third a pipe.


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249. THREE FLOATING INFANT ANGELS.

Bas-relief.

The artist has well distinguished, in sentiment, these winged angelic boys from three Cupids, and the management of their arms as they embrace is especially skillful and beautiful. These three bas-reliefs of angels decorate the Cathedral at Copenhagen.


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250. CHARITY.

Bas-relief.

A mother with a child in her arms, while another clings to her drapery.

Designed for the font in a church at Copenhagen, about the year 1810; executed in marble for the Marquis of Landsdowne.


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251. CHRIST BLESSING CHILDREN.

Bas-relief.

One of the late religious works executed by the artist after his return to Denmark, about the year 1840.


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252. THE VIRGIN WITH THE INFANT CHRIST AND ST.JOHN.

Bas-relief.

A Holy Family, somewhat cold and formal.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:43

CHRISTIAN FRIEDRICH TIECK.
1776 – 1851

The brother of the celebrated poet and critic, Ludwig Tieck, was born in Berlin, 1776.

He studied drawing under Godfried Shadow, and then went to Paris, where he studied some years. He was afterwards, under the patronage and direction of Goethe, employed in the decoration of the Grand-Ducal Palace at Weimar. He was invited by Madame de Stael to Switzerland, where he executed several busts, including her own, and that of her second husband, M. Rocca. The king of Bavaria also employed him on a number of the busts for the Valhalla. It does not appear that he has produced any work on a very large scale; he is chiefly remarkable for his busts, and portraits in bas-relief. His atelier was at Berlin, where he formed some excellent scholars; amongst others, the Bohemian, Kiss, whose colossal group of the Amazon and the Lion was so much admired in the Great Exhibition.

Tieck died on the 14th June, 1851.


The following series of eight small statues seated, form part of a set of fifteen classical subjects, executed in marble, to decorate the sleeping–chamber of the King of Prussia :-

253. EROS, the Greek Cupid.


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Russell & Sons Guidebook.

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Tieck's "Eros" outside the Sheffield Court. Ariadne just visible to the right.

254. DIONYSOS, the Greek Bacchus.

255. ARIADNE, reclining, and asleep; she is thus represented, because, while sleeping in the Island of Naxos she was deserted by her ungrateful lover Theseus (whose life she had saved), and found there by Bacchus, who made her his bride.


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256. PSYCHE, holding the lamp.

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257. ACHILLES, holding his sword.

258. ULYSSES, holding his sword, and with the accustomed cap.

259. IPHIGENIA, half kneeling, as victim; the altar and stag behind her.

260. MARS.[/quote]

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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:44

THEODOR WAGNER.
1800 – 1880

Theodore Wagner, born at Stuttgart, in 1800; studied under Dannecker.


https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodor_Wagner_(Bildhauer)

261. A MAGDALEN.

Statue. Life-size.

She is reclining on the earth : one hand rests on a book (the Scriptures); in the other she holds a cross, which she contemplates with profound grief.

Executed in marble, in 1843.

Compare this with the conception of Canova, No. 138.

Sacred subject ; picturesque treatment.


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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:45

HERMAN WITTICH.
1815 -

Herman Wittich, born in 1815 ; studied in the Academy at Berlin, and afterwards became a pupil of Tieck.

One of his best works is a group of Siegfried and Chremhilda, cast in bronze in 1850.


Hermann Wittig (1845-1882) ?

or

August Wittig (1823-1893)

"
(b Meissen, 23 March 1823; d D?sseldorf, 20 Feb 1893).
German sculptor.

From 1843 to 1849 he studied under Ernst Friedrich August Rietschel at the Kunstakademie in Dresden.

From 1849 to 1864 he was in Rome, where he developed his classical style. He produced reliefs and sculpted groups, preferring themes from Classical mythology and the Bible, though much of his work has been lost. The remaining examples include the romantic Siegfried's Farewell from Kriemhild (bronze, 1850; Dresden, Skulpsamml.) and the bronze relief of the Entombment for the tomb of the Schoeller Family (1850; D?ren, Evangel. Cemetery).

Contemporary critics received his works favourably, particularly because of their emotional expression, and with their support he became Professor of Sculpture at the K?nigliche Preussische Kunstakademie in Dusseldorf in 1864. There he created a museum of casts of Classical and other sculptures as a teaching aid and primarily used the works of Pheidias, Michelangelo and Peter Vischer as examples for his pupils. His love of Classical sculpture was reflected in his suggestion to his students that a version of the Venus de Milo (Paris, Louvre) should be reconstructed with Venus holding the shield of Mars before her like a mirror, though the project was never carried out. In 1869 he created a life-size bronze bust of the Director of the Kunstakademie, Wilhelm Schadow (D?sseldorf, Schadow-Platz), to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the institution's refounding. Wittig's last work was the model (1892) for his own grave (Dusseldorf, North Cemetery), which is decorated with a bronze Pieta."

- Oxford Grove Art via Answers.com [and like to be a very out of date copy.]

Bingo ! August Wittig !

http://translate.google.co.uk/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_Wittig&ei=kH-rTfzlN8nA8QPgg6y5Ag&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CCoQ7gEwAg&prev=/search%3Fq%3D%2522august%2Bwittig%2522%26hl%3Den%26prmd%3Divns

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262. HAGAR

Colossal Group.


Plaster 1854. Executed in marble in 1874 for the Alte Nationalgalerie Berlin.

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Stereoview. Stationery Court to the right.

263. A HUNTER.

Statue. Life-size.

In the left hand he holds his bow, and with the right draws an arrow from his quiver. Full of life, and very well executed. Classical. Compare with No. 20.


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Stereoview of 'Hunter' by August Wittig at the Crystal Palace, Sydenham.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:45

MAX [von] WINDMANN.
1812 -

Born in 1812, at Eichstadt, in Bavaria. He studied his art under Scwanthaler, at Munich, and became one of that great artist’s favourite pupils and assistants. He has succeeded Scwanthaler as Professor of Sculpture in the Academy at Munich.


Max von Widmann 1812 - 1895

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_von_Widnmann

264. A HUNTER DEFENDING HIS FAMILY.

“Colossal Group.

The mother clasps her child to her bosom, while the father is contending with an enraged female panther, who appears to have been robbed of her young. This fine animated group was executed in marble in 1851.


Image

Image

265. THE SHIELD OF HERCULES.

Bas-relief. As described by Hesiod. Compare with No. 215.
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:47

EMIL WOLFF

EMILIUS WOLFF.
1802 - 1879

Emil Wolff, born at Berlin in 1796; studied with Rudolf Schadow, and afterwards with Thorwaldsen. He is settled at Rome, where he has a distinguished reputation. He excels in animals, and has executed some very good works in the religious style. Wolff visited England in 1841; obtained the patronage of the Queen and Prince Albert; and executed a statue of the Prince in the costume of a Greek Warrior [Osborne House.]


266. TELEPHUS SUCKLED BY A HIND.

Group. Smaller than life.

Telephus, the son of Hercules, and Augeia (a priestess of Minerva) was, after his birth, exposed on Mount Parthenion, where he was found and suckled by a hind; he was afterwards King of Mysia.

The original marble was executed for the King of Prussia.


Image

267. A NEREIDE.

Statue. Life size.

Or, rather, a nymph fishing (Pescatrice); she is reclining on the seashore, with shell fish near her.


Image

Image

268. A GERMAN MAIDEN WITH A LAMB.

Statuette.

Executed in marble for Mr. [Richard Vaughan] Yates, of Liverpool. [1785-1856] Picturesque.


Image

269. WINTER.

Represented here by a boy, or genius, wrapped in a lion’s skin, holding in one hand a fir-cone, with which, in Italy, they kindle the fire. In the ornamental style.


Image

270. DIANA.

Statue. Small life-size. Standing, and leaning on her elbow. Classical.


Image

271. A FLOWER GIRL.

Standing, with a basket of flowers on her head. In the ornamental style.


This is an error, and is #168 again, an error repeated in the ART JOURNAL
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Postby tulse hill terry » 3 May 2010 13:48

JOHANN NEPOMUK ZWERGER.
1796 - 1868

Born in 1798, at Donau-Eschingen, in Wurtemburg; studied under Dannecker and Thorwaldsen. He is Professor of Sculpture at Frankfort.


http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Nepomuk_Zwerger

272. A SHEPHERD BOY.
Statue. Smaller than life.

He is seated, with one hand holding his pipe, with the other caressing his dog. Classical.


Image
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