Replacing windows

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Sydering
Posts: 12
Joined: 22 Sep 2018 18:13

Replacing windows

Post by Sydering » 21 Sep 2019 11:37

Dull post but, I'm looking to replace windows and doors in my house. Has anyone recently done this and can recommend a company? Also I can't decide between sash windows or just opening ones. Does anyone have an opinion?

Thanks in advance

mikej
Posts: 401
Joined: 14 Dec 2006 21:55
Location: New Beckenham

Re: Replacing windows

Post by mikej » 24 Sep 2019 12:08

My advice would be to replace with the sash windows. We had 60s style double-glazed in our Victorian property, which were useless in hot weather. Then a few years ago we replaced them with double-glazed wooden sash windows, which make the house look MUCH better. Even better, they've enabled us to cope in hot nights. The trick (which many seem not to know) is to open BOTH sashes on the hottest nights. Cooler air then comes in through the bottom gap, warm air leaves by the top. Perfect!
It seems the modern upvc designs are a step backwards and those Victorians had better designs.

alywin
Posts: 714
Joined: 27 Aug 2009 12:33
Location: Penge side of Sydenham

Re: Replacing windows

Post by alywin » 28 Sep 2019 23:29

Assuming you have a Victorian/Edwardian property or similar, I'd certainly recommend sticking with sashes (at least where they can be seen - I'll admit we didn't put one in the bathroom) for authenticity - some of the alternatives can look downright weird, especially when open. And I agree with Mike about airflow. Could I also point out how very environmentally unfriendly uPVC production is, in case that's a concern? I saw some flyers locally a year or two ago for a company which does wooden sashes - I'm trying to remember where. Might have been the dry cleaners down at Penge East, or Alexandra Garden Centre. I don't think it was on the "noticeboard" on the side of the coffee stall down at Penge East ...

monkeyarms
Posts: 272
Joined: 28 Jul 2015 14:54
Location: Tredown

Re: Replacing windows

Post by monkeyarms » 18 Oct 2019 07:51

If you can, go for the solution with the best energy performance (eg triple glazing, which, confusingly doesn't always literally refer to triple glazing so much as the best performance, I understand). It will cost more but it should hopefully make your heating bills less. And give you a warm self-righteous glow of eco satisfaction.

Rachael
Posts: 2438
Joined: 23 Jan 2010 13:42
Location: Sydenham / Forest Hill Intersection

Re: Replacing windows

Post by Rachael » 21 Oct 2019 18:13

We replaced our rotting wooden sashes with double-glazed made-to-measure wooden sashes with Victorian detailing. You can't tell they are double glazed to look at them. They also have draught-proofing brushes built into the frames. We're very happy with them and they look the business.

Clovers
Posts: 5
Joined: 27 Oct 2019 08:14

Re: Replacing windows

Post by Clovers » 2 Nov 2019 14:53

Rachael wrote:
21 Oct 2019 18:13
We replaced our rotting wooden sashes with double-glazed made-to-measure wooden sashes with Victorian detailing. You can't tell they are double glazed to look at them. They also have draught-proofing brushes built into the frames. We're very happy with them and they look the business.
Which firm did you use, Rachael?

Rachael
Posts: 2438
Joined: 23 Jan 2010 13:42
Location: Sydenham / Forest Hill Intersection

Re: Replacing windows

Post by Rachael » 2 Nov 2019 21:42

We used the Sash Guy, based in East Dulwich. He bespoke makes every frame. There are lots of reviews for him on the East Dulwich Forum.

Clovers
Posts: 5
Joined: 27 Oct 2019 08:14

Re: Replacing windows

Post by Clovers » 9 Nov 2019 15:42

Thank you

Gerard88
Posts: 2
Joined: 24 Nov 2019 13:48

Re: Replacing windows

Post by Gerard88 » 1 Dec 2019 14:55

alywin wrote:
28 Sep 2019 23:29
Assuming you have a Victorian/Edwardian property or similar, I'd certainly recommend sticking with sashes( meilleur crédit ) (at least where they can be seen - I'll admit we didn't put one in the bathroom) for authenticity - some of the alternatives can look downright weird, especially when open. And I agree with Mike about airflow. Could I also point out how very environmentally unfriendly uPVC production is, in case that's a concern? I saw some flyers locally a year or two ago for a company which does wooden sashes - I'm trying to remember where. Might have been the dry cleaners down at Penge East, or Alexandra Garden Centre. I don't think it was on the "noticeboard" on the side of the coffee stall down at Penge East ...
Hi, yes, I am fully, agree with you :) Good luck. Sincerely

stuart
Posts: 3213
Joined: 21 Sep 2004 10:13
Location: Lawrie Park
Contact:

Re: Replacing windows

Post by stuart » 1 Dec 2019 15:26

We don't have sashes but some rather nice leaded lights in beautifully crafted oak frames which would be a crime to trash. Instead we installed secondary glazing ourselves. Not as effective as double glazing but has an upside of being considerably cheaper and unobtrusive. Ours is a magnetic system which means they can be easily removed in summertime if you wish.

There are several suppliers. We went with https://secondarydiyglazing.com. They have videos of their sash system which you may wish to investigate.

But if you have warped or rotting windows I would go for full double glazing.

Stuart

maestro
Posts: 1132
Joined: 27 Jun 2008 16:32
Location: 2nd most struck UK bridge

Re: Replacing windows

Post by maestro » 2 Dec 2019 12:03

I also installed magnetic secondary glazing to my eight large wooden sash windows and I've found it very effective. My property is Grade II listed and I am compelled to have to maintain them, I am forbidden from fitting UPVC windows even if they may be identical in appearance. I had them all taken out, recorded and draught proofed but they were still very draughty in high winds and streamed with condensation in cold weather. Magnetic secondary glazing has cured 99% of these issues at a cost of only about £80 per window. The suppliers I used were........

https://www.tubeway.co.uk/easyfix-diy/m ... e-pro.html

https://www.sheetplastics.co.uk/ (I chose 4mm thick clear acrylic)

stuart
Posts: 3213
Joined: 21 Sep 2004 10:13
Location: Lawrie Park
Contact:

Re: Replacing windows

Post by stuart » 5 Dec 2019 13:07

Good to hear of your experience Maestro especially as we have used the same product. SecondaryDIYGlazing is the consumer brand for Tubeway. Both supply Easyfix. The service was remarkable. I put in 3 orders. All were beautifully cut to size, despatched the following day and delivered the day after. Oh, and in place the day after that. Hard to beat.

The only fault i could find was no referral bonuses ;-)

Stuart

mosy
Posts: 3926
Joined: 21 Sep 2007 20:28
Location: London

Re: Replacing windows

Post by mosy » 7 Dec 2019 13:37

I could do with a secondary whatever for a French double door which has a concrete lintel. How are the fixings put on since you're not supposed to drill into concrete (can cause stress fractures)?
Ta.

maestro
Posts: 1132
Joined: 27 Jun 2008 16:32
Location: 2nd most struck UK bridge

Re: Replacing windows

Post by maestro » 9 Dec 2019 12:06

Stuart might back me up on this, I don't think magnetic secondary glazing would be suitable for doors. Acrylic panels are easily damaged, one of mine had to be scrapped when I received the delivery of the eight as it had been damaged by the courier, I took a pic of it and sent it to the supplier, it was replaced by them immediately no problem. When I say 99% of my draught and condensation issues have been cured,the minor problem I occasionally get is that during periods of very high winds, the constant buffeting by the draught coming through some of the sash windows can make the acrylic pane slip slightly so the seal isn't perfect, I then have the tell tale signs of a little misting having formed inside, removing the pane and ensuring the magnetic strip is firmly clamped back on the metal strips immediately solves this. If these were fitted to doors which are frequently opened and may get banged or slammed shut, you'd be in danger of the acrylic panes falling off and suffering serious damage. If, however, they were doors you only used very occasionally and could be bothered to remove them every time you needed to open them, then you might get away with it.

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